Teacher Educators are Teachers First by Practicing What They Teach

Teacher Educators are Teachers First by Practicing what they Teach. This is the first of several posts that will be published here about the art of teacher education.  There is a rich body of research on teacher education, and I will make use of recent work that shows that teacher education is a vibrant and […]

The Artistry of Teaching

The artistry of teaching is a commitment to the idea that there is more to teaching than the application of principles of teaching that have emerged out of research and practice. Eliot Eisner remarked that the artistry of teaching occurs in the interstices (space, opening, interface) between frameworks and actions (theory and practice). The artistry […]

What Everybody Ought to Know About Teaching

In this post I am going to share some thinking about teaching that I learned along my journey as a teacher from three people.  I future posts I’ll share thoughts about teaching from other people who I’ve met along the way. What everybody ought to know about teaching is a response to what Henry Giroux […]

Practicing What They Preach: Science Teacher Educators Return to School

In a forthcoming book, 25 science teacher educators describe their experiences after returning to teach students in K-12 public schools and informal settings.  Science Teacher Educators as K-12 Teachers: Practicing What We Teach was edited by Michael Dias, professor of biology and science education, Kennesaw State University (Georgia), Charles J. Eich, professor of science education, […]

Anthony Cody Writes: A Million Teachers Prepare to March Out the Classroom Door

Guest Post by Anthony Cody Anthony Cody spent 24 years working in Oakland schools, 18 of them as a science teacher at a high needs middle school. He is National Board certified, and now leads workshops with teachers focused on Project Based Learning. With education at a crossroads, he invites you to join him in […]

On Teaching from Spencer's Scratch Pad

One of the blogs on my blogroll that I suggest that you visit is Spencer’s Scratch Pad by John Spencer, a social studies teacher in Arizona.  He actually has several blogs, that you can visit here, here, and here. Today, one of his postings was in reference to the shooting of more than a dozen […]

On Teaching from Spencer’s Scratch Pad

One of the blogs on my blogroll that I suggest that you visit is Spencer’s Scratch Pad by John Spencer, a social studies teacher in Arizona.  He actually has several blogs, that you can visit here, here, and here. Today, one of his postings was in reference to the shooting of more than a dozen […]

Teaching in America: It Should Not Be About Winning

There was an opinion piece in the New York Times on Sunday by Thomas Friedman entitled Teaching for America. On the front page on the Times website, the article title was Teaching to Win. Friedman’s article is supportive of current reform efforts, and the charge that the nations schools have put us in a hole […]

Stimulating Innovation: The Key to Economic Recovery & Education Reform

The nation is about to embark on a path toward economic recovery and reinvestment in the future. I am confidant that we can do this. But to listen to some of the Governor’s these days, you would wonder what they are thinking, and why they are letting the citizens of their states down at the […]

Stimulating Innovation: The Key to Economic Recovery & Education Reform

The nation is about to embark on a path toward economic recovery and reinvestment in the future. I am confidant that we can do this. But to listen to some of the Governor’s these days, you would wonder what they are thinking, and why they are letting the citizens of their states down at the […]

Career Changers: Attracting People to Science Teaching

Change is on the minds of everyone these days.  Mike Dias sent me a news release that originated from the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation, entitled “National Survey Identifies Incentives To Attract Talented Career Changers into America’s Classrooms.”  According to the news release, career changers might be the best way to solve the problem of finding 1.5 […]

Computer Backlash? How about a classroom revolution!

Four nearly 20 years, my colleagues and I were involved in using technology to enhance teaching and learning not only at the university level, but at the K-12 level as well. We wanted to use computers to enhance active learning in the classroom, and to find ways to help students engage in collaborative scientific research […]

Teaching Globally: Teaching in Another Culture

Charles Hutchison’s new book, Teaching in America leads me to think about the experiences we’ve had in exchange programs for students and teachers. In the 1990s, many of us were involved with a number of countries, including the USSR (Russia and the other Independent States that emerged from the Soviet State), Spain, Czech Republic, Australia […]

Teaching in America: A Cross-Cultural Guide for International Teachers

Dr. Charles Hutchison, University of North Carolina at Charlotte, has published a new book entitled Teaching in America, A Cross-Cultural Guide for International Teachers and Their Employers (Springer Publishers, The Netherlands, 2005). Dr. Hutchison’s book grew out of his doctoral research study as well as his 9 years of teaching in American schools as an […]

Teaching Evolution in Church

Several weeks ago, I read an article in the Washington Post, entitled Darwin goes to Church, written by Henry G. Brinton, pastor of Fairfax Presbyterian Church. In the adult Sunday school classes, David Bush, a member of the church, and a retired government worker is offering a course, “Evolution for Christians.” Being a Christian myself, […]

Rita and Katrina, Linking Natural Disasters, People and Science

The two hurricanes, Rita and Katrina, that have impacted millions of people directly, and the rest of the US population indirectly, as well as many people around the world, bring home the importance of making science education real, and encouraging students to be engaged with real problems and events in nature. Too much science teaching […]

Inquiry: Learning to Open the Mind

One of my favorite columns appears in Newsweek Magazine entitled The Last Word by Anna Quindlen. In a recent piece (May 30, 2005), “Life of the Closed Mind,” Qundlen is concerned that in recent years (after 9/11), America has become a country that sets its young people the terrible example of closed minds. What is […]