Letter to Senator Purdue: Please Do Not Support Trump’s Bullying & the Paris Cancelation

Letter to Senator Purdue: Please Do Not Support Trump’s Bullying & the Paris Cancelation I received a reply to my recent letter to Georgia Senator David Purdue regarding the firing of James Comey from his position as F.B.I. Director.  I was impressed with the specific detail that was included in the letter from Senator Purdue. […]

A Story of Global Inquiry in Action

Eighth Article in the Series, Artistry in Teaching In this article I am going talk about a project that grew out of personal and professional relationships among teachers from different countries.  Through reciprocal exchanges among educators in U.S. (most of whom where from schools in Georgia) and Russia (most of whom were from Moscow, Pushchino […]

Why in a liberal democracy are we centralizing education reform?

Why is the United States moving toward a centralized reform of education in a society that is based on democratic principles, and at a time when other countries are moving in the opposite direction? In his book, Catching Up or Leading the Way, Yong Zhao, Presidential Chair and Associate Dean for Global Education, the University […]

Ecology Projects

I recently received an announcement of an ecology program from John Kamman whose organization sponsors field science and cultural exchange projects.  The organization is Ecology Project International and has projects and programs in Montana, Costa Rica, Mexico, and Galapagos.  Their website describes many opportunities for students and teachers in the field of ecology and environmental […]

Earthday and the Global Thinking Project

In 1987 I met Sergey Tolstikov, who at the time was the lead English teacher at Moscow Experimental Gymnasium 710.  Sergey, along with many of his colleagues at School 710, and other schools in Moscow, St. Petersburg (Leningrad at the time), Pushchino, Yasoslav, and Chelyabinsk teamed up with American teachers to create the Global Thinking […]

Three Ways to Interest Students in Science

Perhaps the fundamental goal of science education should be finding ways to interest students in science.  Stephen Hornstra Landgraaf, (The Netherlands) made this statement as part of his comment in my previous post.  In this era of standards-based education we leave most students outside of science, and do little to bring them in to see […]

Action-Oriented Science Education

Last night my wife and I had dinner with very close friends of ours, Jenny & Dennis Springer. Dr. Jenny Springer, former principal of Dunwoody High School, and Associate Superintendent of Dekalb County Schools (Georgia) was an administrator that created an environment in which teachers thrived, and excelled in their work with students. I first […]

Transforming science teaching through social activism: Is it a viable goal?

There was a very interesting new comment made on an earlier post entitited Should science teaching be political: A Humanistic Question.  In that post I explored the ideas of researcher Wildson dos Santos, who had published an article: Scientific literacy: A Freirean perspective as a radical view of humanistic science education. In the comment made, […]

From Earthday to Earthmonth: A Holistic Approach to Science Teaching

On Wednesday (Today) we celebrate Earthday, founded on April 22, 1970 by Senator Gaylord Nelson, and around the world it is a day that focuses on educating all of us for the environment with activities, celebrations, conferences, and programs. You can visit the Earthday Network to explore a myriad of resources that are available to […]

Holistic Teaching: Integrating ideas of Vernadsky & Lovelock into science teaching

The opening sentence in John Miller’s book, The Holistic Curriculum is that holistic education attempts to bring education into alignment with the fundamental realities of nature. Nature at its core is holistic,interrelated and dynamic. As such we have much to learn about curriculum from environmental education, and the science-technology-society (STS) movement (each developed In previous […]

Holistic Teaching: Integrating ideas of Vernadsky & Lovelock into science teaching

The opening sentence in John Miller’s book, The Holistic Curriculum is that holistic education attempts to bring education into alignment with the fundamental realities of nature. Nature at its core is holistic,interrelated and dynamic. As such we have much to learn about curriculum from environmental education, and the science-technology-society (STS) movement (each developed In previous […]

Global Thinking & the Gaia Theory

In 1989 I met Dr. Anatoly Zaklebyney, professor of environmental science education, the Russian Academy of Education, Moscow. I was working with American and Russian teachers on a project that had emerged from teacher and researcher exchanges that I directed for the Association for Humanistic Psychology. Our project in Russia was organized by the Russian […]

Global Thinking & the Gaia Theory

In 1989 I met Dr. Anatoly Zaklebyney, professor of environmental science education, the Russian Academy of Education, Moscow. I was working with American and Russian teachers on a project that had emerged from teacher and researcher exchanges that I directed for the Association for Humanistic Psychology. Our project in Russia was organized by the Russian […]

The Gaia Theory: Implications for Science Teaching

I returned this week from a two week trip to Texas, and waiting for me in the mail was a book I had pre-ordered from Amazon.  The title of the book is James Lovelock: In Search of Gaia, and it was written by John Gribbin & Mary Gribbin.  Here’s what the book is about: In […]

Paradigm shifts: Education about, in and for the environment

Education about, in, and for the environment represent three different paradigms useful in helping us view environmental education and environmental science programs and activities.  Based on research by Rachel Michel (1996), these three paradigms can briefly be described as follows: Education about the environment is viewed as an approach in which information about the environment (concepts, facts, […]

From Volcanoes in Your Backyard to Snow in Mine

About a week ago, I wrote a post entitled Volcano in Your Backyard, which was initiated by the Governor of Louisiana’s comment that spending money on volcano monitoring was an other example of wasteful spending by the government. February 8, 1984, I was on board a Delta Airlines flight from Atlanta to Portland, and as […]

Track II Diplomacy and Science Teaching

In yesterday’s post, I used the phrase “track II diplomacy” when I was reporting an interview with Dr. Peter Agre, the new president of the AAAS. It turns out that Dr. Agre agrees with a group of American scientists who wish to talk with North Korean scientists, in a sort of “informal diplomacy,” discussion, and […]

Paradigm 2 Schools: Some Examples

Georgia Bracey, from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, commented with an important question regarding the existence of schools that might be based on the humanistic paradigm (Paradigm 2) outlined in the previous post. There are many schools around the nation that embody a humanistic, student-centered character. I’ll talk here about a few of them. When I […]

Calling for a Change in Science Teaching is Not New, It’s Bold

We are experiencing one of the most stressful economic downturns since the Great Depression.  To deal with this calamity the Federal Government has initiated a bailout of the banking system in hopes of staving off a collapse of the flow of money in our society.  We are also seeing rapid movement of the part of […]

Calling for a Change in Science Teaching is Not New, It's Bold

We are experiencing one of the most stressful economic downturns since the Great Depression.  To deal with this calamity the Federal Government has initiated a bailout of the banking system in hopes of staving off a collapse of the flow of money in our society.  We are also seeing rapid movement of the part of […]

Paradigm Shift: Catching Up with Creative Teachers

I have been writing about change recently, and how change is needed in the science curriculum, and the pedagogy that we use to help students learn science.  Indeed, I’ve suggested we suspend high-risk testing until we can show that this type of assessment model tells us what students know, and how well teachers are teaching. […]

Union of Concerned Students

A bit of play on words, but today I received an email (which was sent to hundreds of people) from Kevin Knobloch, President of the Union of Concerned Scientists.  In the letter, Knobloch, who sees the election of Obama as a historical moment for the Union of Concerned Scientists, and its supporters, outlined key issues […]

Science Curriculum—A Global Perspective

In this post I want to announce a new website entitled: Science Curriculum—A Global Perspective. In the last two posts I alluded to science teaching from a global perspective.  In the first of these two posts, entitled Infusing Global Thinking into science teaching, I discussed some examples of how educators have developed programs that infuse […]

Infusing Global ‘Thinking’ into Science Teaching

Some 15 years ago I met Boris Berenfeld, a scientist and researcher working at TERC (he is now a principal researcher at the Concord Consortium) on the Global Lab project, which was developed during the time I was working with colleagues in the US and Russia on the Global Thinking Project (GTP).   Berenfeld was a […]

Infusing Global 'Thinking' into Science Teaching

Some 15 years ago I met Boris Berenfeld, a scientist and researcher working at TERC (he is now a principal researcher at the Concord Consortium) on the Global Lab project, which was developed during the time I was working with colleagues in the US and Russia on the Global Thinking Project (GTP).   Berenfeld was a […]

First Experiences Using the Internet in Science Teaching

I had two real first experiences using the Internet. Here’s the first: I had purchased my first personal computer in 1980. It was an Apple II, which was invented by Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple Computer. In his book, iWoz, Wozniak describes his unbelievable creativity in firstly inventing the Apple I, and followed soon […]

Web-Based Innovations for Science Teaching

In the next few posts I am going to talk about using the Internet in science teaching. In 1995, I published my first website for the Global Thinking Project, and ever since then, have been involved in developing websites for my own projects, and teaching others how to develop their own websites for teaching. Since […]

Authenticity as a Pathway to Humanistic Science Teaching

One of the serious issues related to contemporary science teaching is the dominance of traditional science teaching as defined by the rhetoric of standards-based science curriculum. Most students experience a science curriculum that is fundamentally didactic, rarely involving the students in authentic learning activities. The traditional model is overly mechanistic, individualistic, and focused on the […]

Citizen Scientists: Humanizing Science Teaching

There was an article in USA Today’s newspaper about citizen scientists that prompted this post. The article described Project BudBurst, a national field study that tracks the dates that 60 plant species leaf and flower this spring and summer. The purpose of the project is to involve citizens in collecting important climate change data on […]

Social Networking and Science Teaching

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web had a dream for the web and he put it this way: “When I proposed the Web in 1989, the driving force I had in mind was communication through shared knowledge, and the driving market for it was collaboration among people at work and at home.” […]

Project Beijing Air Quality

One of the issues of concern to many people is the impact of the air quality in Beijing on the athletes competing in outdoor activities, especially those involving 5K, 10K and all of the long distance running events, as well as many swimming events. Beijing’ air quality is could impact the health of the athletes, […]

The Value of Student-to-Student Exchanges

For nearly 20 years, I was involved with a project that started in the 1980’s with people to people exchanges between educators and psychologists in North America with colleagues in the Soviet Union. We made annual visits and conducted seminar-type sessions with schools, universities and research institutes. After several visits, we started an exchange program […]

Views of Global Warming and Climate Change

Last week I wrote several entries on the topic of global warming, and most recently on legislation at the Federal level related to global warming. Is the Earth warming? According climate change scientists, the answer is yes, as shown in the graph below. However, making policy changes, as we have discussed here in this blog, […]

Global Thinking

In the last post I wrote about Citizen Diplomacy as enacted by hundreds of North American and Soviet psychologists and educators beginning in the 1980s at the height of the Cold War. One of the outcomes (there were many), was the co-creation of the Global Thinking Project (originally called the Soviet-American Global Thinking Project). The […]

It’s Getting Hotter in Atlanta

Well, hot temperatures are arriving in the Atlanta area; but its been hot in Texas. What’s the fuss. It’s summer. Well last year, 2005, was the hottest year during a period of temperature measurements from 1860 to today. These measurements include combined annual land, air and sea surface temperatures. Take a look at the graph […]

It's Getting Hotter in Atlanta

Well, hot temperatures are arriving in the Atlanta area; but its been hot in Texas. What’s the fuss. It’s summer. Well last year, 2005, was the hottest year during a period of temperature measurements from 1860 to today. These measurements include combined annual land, air and sea surface temperatures. Take a look at the graph […]

An Inconvenient Truth

I’ve been thinking about writing something about Al Gore’s new book, An Inconvenient Truth: The Planetary Emergency of Global Warming and What We Can Do About It.A book such as this naturally controversial, but from at least two points of view. Firstly, its a scientific book written by a “recovering” politician (a term Gore used […]

Teaching Globally: Teaching in Another Culture

Charles Hutchison’s new book, Teaching in America leads me to think about the experiences we’ve had in exchange programs for students and teachers. In the 1990s, many of us were involved with a number of countries, including the USSR (Russia and the other Independent States that emerged from the Soviet State), Spain, Czech Republic, Australia […]

Using the Web to Transform Learning Possibilities

Fifteen years ago, a team of educators from Georgia took 6 Macintosh SE 20 computers, modems, and printers to the then Soviet Union, and then proceeded to install one computer, modem and printer in five different schools we were collaborating with (2 in Moscow and 3 in St. Petersburg). We connected each computer to a […]