Atlanta Public Schools’ Equity Audit Finds Differences! by Ed Johnson

Guest Letter by Mr. Ed Johnson, Advocate for Education, Atlanta, GA Ed Johnson wrote a letter in response to the Atlanta Public Schools Equity Audit which was prepared by researchers at Georgia State University to look at differences in the characteristics across schools in the APS district.  As you will see in Ed Johnson’s letter, […]

What Sort of Teacher Preparation Programs Does the Gates Foundation Support?

Did you know that between 2008 and 2013, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation provided more than $37 million in funding for teacher preparation projects? What sort of teacher preparation programs does the Gates Foundation support? Only 8% of these funds were awarded to university teacher education programs. Ninety-two percent of the grant money was […]

What Everybody Ought to Know About Teaching

In this post I am going to share some thinking about teaching that I learned along my journey as a teacher from three people.  I future posts I’ll share thoughts about teaching from other people who I’ve met along the way. What everybody ought to know about teaching is a response to what Henry Giroux […]

Inverse Relationship between Common Standards & Innovative Science Teaching?

Is there an inverse relationship between the use of common standards and innovative and differentiated science teaching? I saw a former science education student today as I walking into the local Home Depot.  He is currently teaching physics at a local high school.  He earned his second master’s degree in science education in the TEEMS […]

Inverse Relationship between Common Standards & Innovative Science Teaching?

Is there an inverse relationship between the use of common standards and innovative and differentiated science teaching? I saw a former science education student today as I walking into the local Home Depot.  He is currently teaching physics at a local high school.  He earned his second master’s degree in science education in the TEEMS […]

Teach for America Needs to Evolve to a Realistic Teacher Education Program: Part 1

There are two parts to this discussion which examines why I think Teach for America needs to evolve to a realistic teacher education program, and not continue putting uncertified and according to the research not as effective as certified teachers in America’s classrooms. Here is Part 1.  You can read Part 2 here. Snubbing Teaching […]

Learning to Teach in America: Pathways and Exits

Aspiring teachers can find their way to teaching in one of two pathways, teacher education programs (TE) at public and private universities or alternative programs, such Teach for America (TFA).  Although there are mixed results, there is little to no evidence that the Teach for America teachers are more effective than teachers who graduate from America’s teacher […]

Dr. Joe Abruscato: He Delighted in Teaching Because He Knew It Was Beautiful

I want to tell you about one of my closest friends—Dr. Joe Abruscato—and how he influenced me in my journey through life. Joe and I met in graduate school at The Ohio State University (OSU) in 1967. We were part of a group of high school science teachers who had come from various school districts […]

The Artistry of Science Teaching: It isn’t enough to simply boost beginning teachers’ pay!

I want to follow up from yesterday’s discussion of Georgia’s plan to boost beginning science teachers pay.  I am prompted to do so because of the compelling comment on yesterday’s post by Quin Harrell.  Here is how he began his comment: While I agree with pay increases for math and science teachers, I totally disagree […]

The Artistry of Science Teaching: It isn't enough to simply boost beginning teachers' pay!

I want to follow up from yesterday’s discussion of Georgia’s plan to boost beginning science teachers pay.  I am prompted to do so because of the compelling comment on yesterday’s post by Quin Harrell.  Here is how he began his comment: While I agree with pay increases for math and science teachers, I totally disagree […]

Earthday as a metaphor for a paradigm of informal learning

Informal learning as a paradigm for classroom learning suggests that learning is holistic, and is steeped in inclusiveness and connectedness.  As I suggested yesterday, John Dewey wrote about the importance of an “experiential education” more than 100 years ago, and his words are just as relevant today, as they were then. For many years I […]

Track II Diplomacy and Science Teaching

In yesterday’s post, I used the phrase “track II diplomacy” when I was reporting an interview with Dr. Peter Agre, the new president of the AAAS. It turns out that Dr. Agre agrees with a group of American scientists who wish to talk with North Korean scientists, in a sort of “informal diplomacy,” discussion, and […]

Freedom to Change & Transform the Practice of Science Teaching

Carl Rogers wrote a book many years ago entitled Freedom to Learn.  One of the most significant chapters in his book was “My way of facilitating a class.”  I read this chapter many times, and it had a profound influence on the way that I facilitated my classes at Georgia State University.  As a result […]

Freedom to Change & Transform the Practice of Science Teaching

Carl Rogers wrote a book many years ago entitled Freedom to Learn.  One of the most significant chapters in his book was “My way of facilitating a class.”  I read this chapter many times, and it had a profound influence on the way that I facilitated my classes at Georgia State University.  As a result […]

State-Wide Testing: A Recent Trend?

I wrote in the last two posts I openned a discussion about the phenomenon of state-wide testing that determines whether students are retained or passed (out) on to the next grade. The results, as I pointed out in Georgia, are not exactly “world-class” although Governor and Superintendent of Schools have that as one of their […]