No More Time to Hide: Harvey & Global Climate Change

Although the Trump administration will tell you now is not the time to talk about climate change because they are focusing on helping people. However, now is the time to talk about climate change because the future is grim for people in flood zones, and areas that never were labeled flood zones.  And if a […]

EPA: From Obama’s Protection to Trump’s Destruction to the Emergence of Resistance

EPA: From Obama’s Protection to Trump’s Destruction to the Emergence of Resistance  Using the Wayback Machine, we can keep watch on some aspects of the Environmental Protection Agency website now that Trump and his EPA pick for Secretary of the EPA, Scott Pruitt are in charge. Trump wants to cut the EPA, and Pruitt, with ties to […]

Climate Change: Are We In Trouble?

This is a reblog from the Moyers & Company website. It’s an article written by John Light that I’ve reblogged here as a follow up the May 7th post entitled Extreme Earth: Coming to an Environment Near You. The National Climate Assessment Says We’re in Trouble. This Chart Shows Why. (via Moyers & Company) This […]

A Heads Up: Smoking is to Cancer as Greenhouse Gas Emissions are to Climate Risks

On March 5, Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead signed the state’s budget into law.  The bill has a footnote that prohibits the Department of Education from spending any funds to check or revise the state’s science standards. The reason this footnote was added to the Wyoming budget is because it satisfied some members of the legislature […]

Part II: Will the Debate over Evolution End Soon?

We introduced this topic yesterday and referred to an Associated Press story, in which Richard Leakey suggests that the debate over evolution will end sometime over the next 15 to 30 years.  Leakey’s thesis was: If you get to the stage where you can persuade people on the evidence, that it’s solid, that we are all African, […]

Part I. Will the Debate over Evolution End Soon?

  Richard Leakey says that looking at the past the way paleontologists and anthropologist do can teach us much about the future.  He points out that extinction is one of the most common types of phenomena observed in nature, and that extinctions are related to environmental change.  He suggests that environmental change is controlled by […]

A Letter from 2053 about High-Stakes Testing: 5's Walk on Thursday

Note: This is a letter written by a teen living in Atlanta in the year 2053.  It is published here for the first time.  Although a work of fiction, it is presented here as a reminder of the consequences of making decisions based on faulty reasoning and ignorance. Dear Friends: I learned that in America, […]

A Letter from 2053 about High-Stakes Testing: 5’s Walk on Thursday

Note: This is a letter written by a teen living in Atlanta in the year 2053.  It is published here for the first time.  Although a work of fiction, it is presented here as a reminder of the consequences of making decisions based on faulty reasoning and ignorance. Dear Friends: I learned that in America, […]

Extreme Earth: A new science teaching eBook

The second in a series of science teaching eBooks was published today on the Art of Teaching Science Website.  Entitled Extreme Earth, this eBook explores questions such as: Are the extremes of weather related phenomena such as flooding, tornadoes, hurricanes, drought and fires, as well as major and great earthquakes in heavily populated areas the […]

AAAS Vigorously Opposes Attacks on Climate Change Researchers

Yesterday, the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) published an open letter on its website with the headline: AAAS Board: Attacks on Climate Researchers Inhibit Free Exchange of Scientific Ideas.  In the letter, the Board said: Scientists and policymakers may disagree over the scientific conclusions on climate change and other policy-relevant topics. But […]

Teaching Climate Change

Is climate change real? Is the greenhouse effect based on fundamental science? To what extent are “debates” on TV news outlets using split screen technology peer review or rhetoric? Do large companies abuse the concept of peer review by using rhetoric to cast doubt on scientific findings? These are questions that should underscore student’s pursuit […]

350.org

I signed onto an organization called 350.org. According to materials I received, 350.org is sponsoring climate change actions around the world. The banner will take you to the 350.org site for further details about how you and your students might get involved. Receiving this information is perfect timing for post later this week about Australian […]

Intelligent Design: The Right Sound Bite

One of the candidates who recently announced her candidacy for President said in a speech that “intelligent design” should be taught in science because all sides of an issue in science should be taught. Now that the race is on to see who will challenge our President for his job, one of the areas that […]

Coming Storms: Not the Ones Related to Global Warming

Yesterday’s post, Got Science?, was initiated after I received an email from the Union of Concerned Scientist requesting that I take a pop quiz on global warming, and to request a sticker that says on it “Got Science?” The recent elections will mean that there will be changes in the Chairmanships of all of the […]

Native Science and Global Climate Change

I wrote to a friend of mine who lives in Moscow, Russia to find out how he was doing with the extreme heat and fires that are creating the worst air pollution event in Moscow’s history.  He told me that he has been able to escape the heat by going to his daughter’s flat and […]

Inspiring Your Students to Understand Climate-Change & Our Energy Future

Perhaps the most important role of a teacher is to inspire students to value their intellectual and emotional abilities and to understand how they can use science to “improve the lives of those they have touched and the differences they have made” (quote from Dr. Steven Chu’s commencement speach at Caltech).  It isn’t enough to […]

Inspiring Your Students to Understand Climate-Change & Our Energy Future

Perhaps the most important role of a teacher is to inspire students to value their intellectual and emotional abilities and to understand how they can use science to “improve the lives of those they have touched and the differences they have made” (quote from Dr. Steven Chu’s commencement speach at Caltech).  It isn’t enough to […]

Some Things You Might Want Know About the House’s Clean Energy Bill

In the last post I listed ten reasons to support the Energy Bill passed in the U.S. House.  Here are some things you might find interesting about the bill.  I’ve tried, I really have, to keep my opinions out of this list. It’s long, really long.  When it it was first introduced into the House […]

Some Things You Might Want Know About the House's Clean Energy Bill

In the last post I listed ten reasons to support the Energy Bill passed in the U.S. House.  Here are some things you might find interesting about the bill.  I’ve tried, I really have, to keep my opinions out of this list. It’s long, really long.  When it it was first introduced into the House […]

Top 10 Reasons for the Senate to Pass an Energy Bill

Here are 10 reasons that I think the United States Senate must pass an Energy Bill which would then be reconciled with the House’s Clean Energy Bill (HR 2454).  They are listed in here in no particular order because they are really interrelated, and I don’t think that anyone of these is more important than […]

Scientific Illiteracy in Our House (of Representatives)

Yes, the U.S. Congress did pass the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009 (H.R. 2454), but within Congress—in the House—there was clear evidence of “scientific illiteracy.”  And no, it was not the kind of thinking that we as science teachers advocate.  It turns out that one of the U.S. Representatives from Georgia, Paul […]

Climate Change, Politics and Science Teaching

The new administration in Washington has made it clear that it climate change would be one of the science-related issues that it would deal with, and there is clearly some evidence to support this.  In an article in USA Today, entitled Politics heats up global warming suggested that climate scientists should get involved in the […]

A New Age for Science and Science Education?

In earlier posts on this Weblog, I introduced readers to ScienceDebate2008, a citizen effort to engage the US presidential candidates in a real debate on science, technology and society.  The debates never happened, but each candidate (science advisors, I suppose) answered the 14 questions that ScienceDebate2008 participants generated.  If you haven’t read the questions and […]

Teaching About Global Warming, or Should It Be "Global Weirding"

People who say “drill-baby-drill” are much like people in the 1980s when personal computers came on the scene saying we need more typewriters and carbon paper (paraphrased from Thomas Friedman–see the video in this post).  The “drill-baby-drill” is a mantra of those who are stuck in the past, with their heads in the sand,  and […]

Teaching About Global Warming, or Should It Be “Global Weirding”

People who say “drill-baby-drill” are much like people in the 1980s when personal computers came on the scene saying we need more typewriters and carbon paper (paraphrased from Thomas Friedman–see the video in this post).  The “drill-baby-drill” is a mantra of those who are stuck in the past, with their heads in the sand,  and […]

Environment Important to the People, but not at the Presidential Debates

Charles Blow had a very interesting op-ed column in the New York Times today entitled “all atmospherics, no climate.” The op-ed focused on the graph shown below, generated from survey data by the Pew Research Center, which describes the percentage of Americans who think the issues of protecting the environment, and dealing with the energy […]

The Green Year?

Tomorrow is the year 2007 Earth Day, which started in 1970. Could the year 2007 be the Green Year, the tipping year in which government and industry embraced the importance of environmental sustainability just as the public is beginning to accept, and as the environmental movement has represented. Whether or not the environmental movement began […]

Goldilocks Climates: Do You Live in One?

In today’s NYTimes, Andrew C. Revkin, the outstanding science reporter and writer, published an article entitled Wealth and Poverty, Drought and Flood: Reports from 4 Fronts in the War on Warming. In it he compares and contrasts four locations: Blantre, Malawi and Perth, Australia, each prone to drought, one in big trouble, the other moving […]

How Many Scientists Does It Take?

In today’s NYTimes, Thomas Friedman posted an article entitled How Many Scientists?which was a wonderful play on words about climate change. As Friedman points out, and as we have said on this blog, more than 1000 scientists have read and agree to the Intergovernmental’s Report on Climate Change published in February. How many more scientists […]

Gentle Subversives: Rachel Carson and Frances Oldham Kelsey

Yesterday I used the theme “Meeting of Minds”to focus on the US Congress and its hearing with Al Gore. Today, I would like to play this out one step further, and suggest how the members of the Congressional committees that are responsible for environmental issues and legislation might be informed by two great minds, each […]

Meeting of the Minds on Global Warming: The US Congress, Al Gore, and John P. Holdren

Years ago, Steve Allen, of TV fame, created a program entitled Meeting of the Minds. He would bring together historical figures such as Galileo, Thomas Jefferson, Shakespeare for discussions among themselves of important topics. So here in Washington today we witness the meeting of the minds of Representatives and Senators in the U.S. Congress to […]

Teaching About Climate Change

There was an article today in the New York Times New Warnings on Climate Change by Andrew Revkin. Revkin is a science reporter for the NY Times, and author of book on climate change entitled The North Pole Was Here: Puzzles and Perils at the Top of the World. The book is for 6th graders […]

The Decline of the Aspen

An interesting article caught my attention as I was scrolling through the New York Times online. It was entitled Emblem of the West is Dying, No One Can Figure Out Why. The emblem? The Aspen Tree. Image: A Stand of Aspen Trees Image: Aspen Leaves One of the most beautiful trees to observe in nature, […]

Climate Change Debate

One on the things that Al Gore’s book has done is to bring the issue of climate change (global warming) to the surface via his book/film/appearances/interviews, and also independent reviews and discussions in local neswspapers. In the Atlanta Journal today, there was a very good article on the Issues page entitled “Studies Change Debate’s Climate.” […]