The Manchester Bombing

We fly into Manchester, England two or three times each year, and then travel to Lincoln, which is a city about 120 miles from Manchester.  We are in Lincoln now, and have been for more than a week. The bombing at the Manchester Arena where American singer Ariana Grande was performing, killed 23 people, including […]

New Design for Art of Teaching Science

Welcome to the new and revised design for The Art of Teaching weblog. I’ve changed the title to The Art of Teaching followed by the subtitle: Progressive Science Education. Since 2005, when I started writing this blog, I have used WordPress as the publishing platform.  To design the blog, I am using software from Copyblogger […]

High-Stakes Testing & the Culture of Fear: The Atlanta Case, Report #1

Over the next few days, I am going to write a series of posts on the “Atlanta Test Erasure Scandal” that has dominated the newspapers here in Atlanta, and has been a major story on the national scene.  There is more than meets the eye here, and I hope to shed some light on it, […]

High-Stakes Testing & the Culture of Fear: The Atlanta Case, Report #1

Over the next few days, I am going to write a series of posts on the “Atlanta Test Erasure Scandal” that has dominated the newspapers here in Atlanta, and has been a major story on the national scene.  There is more than meets the eye here, and I hope to shed some light on it, […]

350.org

I signed onto an organization called 350.org. According to materials I received, 350.org is sponsoring climate change actions around the world. The banner will take you to the 350.org site for further details about how you and your students might get involved. Receiving this information is perfect timing for post later this week about Australian […]

Liberalism and science education’s role

I am writing this from 34000 feet in a Delta jet using the airlines free access to it’s wifi. I am also reading a book, The Science of Liberty by Timothy Ferris. The book is the story of how science and the rise of liberal democracies are linked. Science emerged poking holes in authoritarian and […]

Liberalism and science education's role

I am writing this from 34000 feet in a Delta jet using the airlines free access to it’s wifi. I am also reading a book, The Science of Liberty by Timothy Ferris. The book is the story of how science and the rise of liberal democracies are linked. Science emerged poking holes in authoritarian and […]

Science Progress

The Art of Teaching Science Blog advocates a progressive and humanistic paradigm for science teaching. One of sources of research-based information that I regularly consult is Science Progress, “a project of the Center for American Progress, specifically designed to improve public understanding of science and technology and to showcase exciting, progressive ideas about the many […]

Scientific City in Russia

There was an article in today’s New York times about the building of a scientific city by the Russian government.  The plan is to develop a technologically and scientifically vibrant city on the outskirts of Moscow.  The goal of this venture is: Once developed, the site is intended to incubate scientific ideas using generous tax […]

Humanitarian Assistance for Haiti

The United Nations initiated a “flash appeal” for assistance after the devastation earthquake in Haiti.  As the map below shows, the earthquake intensity, based on the Modified Mercalli Intensity Scale (a measure of the violence of earth motion).  Here is a map from USAID which shows the earthquake intensity from the epicenter out to surrounding […]

The Haiti Earthquake: Helping the Survivors & Providing Understanding to your Students about the Haiti Earthquake

It’s three days since the devastating 7.0 earthquake along the junction of the Caribbean & North American tectonic plates about 15 miles from Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, and most people have not received the aid that they need, but judging from written reports, and reports from Haiti, it is arriving, but movement to the people that need […]

The Haiti Earthquake: Helping the Survivors & Providing Understanding to your Students about the Haiti Earthquake

It’s three days since the devastating 7.0 earthquake along the junction of the Caribbean & North American tectonic plates about 15 miles from Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, and most people have not received the aid that they need, but judging from written reports, and reports from Haiti, it is arriving, but movement to the people that need […]

Science-Free Zones

In an interesting commentary in the Austin American-Statesman, Jim Marston (director of the Texas office of Environmental Defense Fund) wonders out-loud that citizens of Texas can not let Texas become a science-free zone. He was prompted to do so because of recent shenanigans of the State Board of Education. At last weeks’ board meeting, the […]

Science-Free Zones

In an interesting commentary in the Austin American-Statesman, Jim Marston (director of the Texas office of Environmental Defense Fund) wonders out-loud that citizens of Texas can not let Texas become a science-free zone. He was prompted to do so because of recent shenanigans of the State Board of Education. At last weeks’ board meeting, the […]

Transforming Science Teaching Practice: Personal Thoughts on Experimenting with and Changing Teaching Practice

In the 1970s and into the early 1980s, the major textbook that I used in graduate science education courses for teachers was Carl Rogers’ book, Freedom to Learn.  Rogers’ book provided the experiential and the theoretical background needed to help teachers transform their practice to incorporate humanistic principles.  The focus of these courses was to […]

A Watershed

Today, we achieved a Watershed in US history by electing Barack Obama as our next President. What else is there to say.  

Science Education Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, September, 2009

I received a note today from my colleague Fatih Tasar, Professor of Science Education at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey that the European Science Education Research Association will hold its annual conference in Istanbul, Turkey, August 31 – September 4, 2009.  Proposal submissions should be made by January 16, 2009. The website for the conference is […]

2nd Edition of The Art of Teaching Science Published

Today, I received a copy of the 2nd Edition of The Art of Teaching Science.  Mike Dias and I worked for the last year and a half on the revision, and we were very happy to receive a copy of the book.     The 2nd Edition of The Art of Teaching Science was organized […]

Grand Challenges in Science: Opportunities for Science Teaching

In an email letter send to all members of NARST, its President, Charlene M. Czerniak reminded members of the theme of next year’s NARST annual meeting: Grand Challenges and Great Opportunities in Science Education.  In her letter, she reminded us that a number of organizations have issued “grand challenges” statements over the past few years.  One of […]

From Oil to Wind: An STS Project

Teaching students about the Earth’s energy future is an important goal of science education.  In the news these days is the debate (because of $4+ gas in the US) about off shore drilling, energy independence (an oxymoron?), wind and other alternative energies.  How should these ideas be approached with students?  What questions should students raise […]

CRCT: A Failed System in Georgia: It Needs to Change.

In yesterday’s Atlanta Journal-Constitution an article reported that the Georgia State Department of Education knew students would fail the social studies test in huge numbers, but refused to share this information with superintendents, teachers or parents in the state. 69% of students in grades 6 and 7 failed or as the state puts it: “Does […]

Risk Assessment Plan Judged “Flawed” by National Research Council

The Bush administration’s Office of Management and Budget prepared a plan to change the rules determining whether chemicals and other products pose risks to human health. The plan was reviewed by The National Research Council, and they concluded that the report was seriously flawed, should be thrown out, and the OMB should start all over! […]

Risk Assessment Plan Judged "Flawed" by National Research Council

The Bush administration’s Office of Management and Budget prepared a plan to change the rules determining whether chemicals and other products pose risks to human health. The plan was reviewed by The National Research Council, and they concluded that the report was seriously flawed, should be thrown out, and the OMB should start all over! […]

Happy Thanksgiving!!

I wish the readers of this blog a Happy Thanksgiving, and hope that you have a wonderful day. Jack Hassard

Science In Whose Service?

The U.S. government is using scientific atmospheric tests to determine whether or not North Korea exploded an underground nuclear device. Air samples taken by the Pentagon have been analyzed, however, with contradictory results. One test showed that there were radioactive atoms in the air samples; another did not. Japan and China tested the air near […]

The Nobel Prizes

The first of five Nobel Prizes was awarded today in Sweden to two American scientists “for their discovery of RNA interference – gene silencing by double-stranded RNA.” The recipient were Andrew Z. Fire (Stanford), and Craig C. Mello (University of Massachusetts. More prizes will be anounced this week: Physics, October 3, Chemistry, October 4, Economics, […]

International Space Station Advances; Impact on Research

NASA announced, after a meeting in Florida among all of the participating countries (United States, Russia, Europe, Japan and Canada), that a new plan for the completing the $100 billion International Space Station (ISS) was worked out. NASA indicated that it would take 16 flights of the space shuttle (Atlantis, Discovery and Endeavour) in order […]