How Fake News Spreads Like a Virus on Twitter (Facebook, too)

Fake News is a type of yellow journalism or propaganda that consists of deliberate misinformation or hoaxes spread via traditional print and broadcast news media or online social media (Wikipedia). Fake news is very easy to spread around the world now that billions of people have access to online social networks, TV, and other media. […]

Bush’s Digital Learning Report Card: Misleading and Disingenuous

In March 2014, Jeb Bush’s organization Digital Learning Now (DLN), issued its 2013 Digital Learning Report Card measuring and grading K-12 education policies in the nation’s 50 states against its 10 Elements of High Quality Digital Learning. I found their report misleading and disingenuous. Digital Learning Now released its report card grading each state on 41 criteria divided into 10 Elements […]

The Common Core: A Dream Come True for the Publishing & Media Industries

> Imagine what it would be like if every school district in the U.S. used the same core (standards) curriculum, and that every few years, new textbooks and media products needed to purchased. If the Common Standards are fully adopted across the nation, then it will be a booming business for media and publishing companies. […]

Using Computers and Related Technologies in an Age of Standards

According to Allan Collins, Professor Emeritus of the Learning Sciences, Northwestern University, in this “age of technology,” the very technology which consumes so many of us, has had little effect on mainstream education. As he pointed out in his book, Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology (library copy), which he wrote with Richard Halverson, […]

Technology as Cure-All for Standards, and Even Snow Days

  Technology is viewed by some as the elixir or cure-all for education, and school districts, with lots of money available through grants such as Race to the Top, technology investments from organization such the Gates Foundation, and law edicts,  have embraced technology as a magic bullet.  Virtual classrooms, digital textbooks, flipped classrooms (use of […]

Is Technology the Trojan Horse of the Common Standard’s Movement?

  Anthony Cody (Living in Dialog) and Mercedes Schneider (deutsch29) wrote articles on their blogs about the Arne Duncan – Bill Gates – Common Standard’s triumvirate.  Cody commented that Duncan and Gates are trying to woo teachers to support the floundering rollout of the Common Standards.  As he explains, teachers were not involved in the development of the Common […]

Is Technology the Trojan Horse of the Common Standard's Movement?

  Anthony Cody (Living in Dialog) and Mercedes Schneider (deutsch29) wrote articles on their blogs about the Arne Duncan – Bill Gates – Common Standard’s triumvirate.  Cody commented that Duncan and Gates are trying to woo teachers to support the floundering rollout of the Common Standards.  As he explains, teachers were not involved in the development of the Common […]

Welcome to A New Web Design for the Art of Teaching Science

Thank you for visiting my blog.  After teaching for forty years, I’ve spent the last ten writing the blog (and a host of other things), The Art of Teaching Science.  For at least five years, I’ve used web themes created by StudioPress (Copyblogger Media) for WordPress, one the most popular programs for designing weblogs and […]

Do MOOCS Serve Schools or Corporations?

MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) seem to be following the historical trend of our infatuation with how technology can solve many of our problems in teaching and learning.  Since 2008, MOOCs have emerged not only as individual and free online courses (such as those offered at universities such as MIT, Stanford and Harvard, but have been […]

A Story of Global Inquiry in Action

Eighth Article in the Series, Artistry in Teaching In this article I am going talk about a project that grew out of personal and professional relationships among teachers from different countries.  Through reciprocal exchanges among educators in U.S. (most of whom where from schools in Georgia) and Russia (most of whom were from Moscow, Pushchino […]

Online Communities of Practice: Lessons from Yahoo

No doubt you’ve read the news reports telling us that Marissa Mayer, the CEO of Yahoo, informed all Yahoo employees that they could no longer work at home. There were many people who felt that Mayer did not understand the value of having employees work at home. Some employees were outraged that they could no longer […]

Congressional Leaders Refuse to Answer Science Questions

ScienceDebate.org and Scientific American asked 33 leaders of science-oriented congressional committees to respond to a set of 8 science, technology and education questions. Here is ScienceDebate.org’s public release of the results of their inquiry. FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Washington — October 16, 2012.  Americans have all heard about the scandalously anti-science comments made by certain members of […]

Russian Science: From Labs in Pushchino to Protests in Moscow

There was an article in the Washington Post entitled In Russia, The Lost Generation of Science.  The article, by Will England, focuses specifically on Pushchino, a little known city south of Moscow, and the status of science in Russia generally.  Science in Russia has undergone an unfortunate transformation, first right after the collapse of the […]

9 Compelling Science, Technology & Education Blogs

There is a profusion of blogs on the Internet, but some of them stand out because they are not only compelling, but they convey accomplished, artful, intelligent, and powerful content.  I’ve selected nine blogs that I read regularly to expand my own thinking about science teaching, technology and education.   They represent the range of […]

9 Compelling Science, Technology & Education Blogs

There is a profusion of blogs on the Internet, but some of them stand out because they are not only compelling, but they convey accomplished, artful, intelligent, and powerful content.  I’ve selected nine blogs that I read regularly to expand my own thinking about science teaching, technology and education.   They represent the range of […]

Will Technology Help Science Teachers Think Different?

Will Technology Help Science Teachers Think Different? I watched a lecture  presented a couple of years ago by Allan Collins which was hosted by The Learning Sciences Group at Penn State, and organized by Penn State Professor Richard Duschl. The title of the talk was Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology, and is title […]

Preparing for a Science Fair Project: An Animation Project

I was informed by Bryan Temmer, that his son Kevin, created a 15 minute animation short that explains how to do a science fair project for one of high school technology projects. Starring Jessica and Jack, the animation, done completely by the author, is a very good program for introducing students to the elements of […]

100 Best Education Blogs

Who are the top education bloggers?  I am not sure it that is the most important question being asked given the current state of education, but it has been asked, and the results are in. Based on the work of Will Roby, a compilation of his favorite blogs to read was recently posted on this […]

Transform your Science Education Blog Posts into eBooks

A few weeks ago, I decided that I wanted to mine my weblog to identify topics and content that could be used to create science education eBooks.  I have nearly 600 posts written over the past seven years, but I didn’t have an easy way to do transform them into eBooks. I wondered whether there […]

3 Inquiry Lessons to Begin Your Science Course This Year

Do you have your plans worked out for the first days of the courses you will teach beginning this month or in September?  Here are three ideas you might consider, especially if you want to begin the year engaging your students in a science inquiry activity. I introduced these projects in the last post as […]

3 Inquiry Lessons to Begin Your Science Course This Year

Do you have your plans worked out for the first days of the courses you will teach beginning this month or in September?  Here are three ideas you might consider, especially if you want to begin the year engaging your students in a science inquiry activity. I introduced these projects in the last post as […]

Three Web 2.0 Science Projects for Your Science Courses

Web 2.0 refers to using the Web in a more interactive, and social way where students can create, share, publish and work together in collaborative groups.  Over the years, science teachers have created a variety of Web 2.0 projects for K-12 students. This post is to announce the availability of three Web 2.0 projects that […]

Science-As-Inquiry, 2nd Edition, Published

Science-as-Inquiry, 2nd Edition has been published by Good Year Books.  It is available for purchase here.  The text that follows the image of the book is part of the Introduction of the book. Science As Inquiry, 2nd Edition weaves together ideas about science teaching and inquiry that were developed over many years of work with practicing […]

Science 2.0 Resources

There were some interesting resources identified in this Summer’s edition of The Science Teacher. In a column entitled Science 2.0, the authors bring our attention to The Synapse, a network connecting hundreds of biology teachers worldwide. Developed by Sean Nash just a couple of years ago, the author named the network after the synapse, the […]

Science 2.0 Resources

There were some interesting resources identified in this Summer’s edition of The Science Teacher. In a column entitled Science 2.0, the authors bring our attention to The Synapse, a network connecting hundreds of biology teachers worldwide. Developed by Sean Nash just a couple of years ago, the author named the network after the synapse, the […]

Summer Science Film Festival

The Learning Network of the New York Times sponsored a series of films in their Film Festival that focused on “classroom worthy” documentaries. One of the days was devoted to science, and the feature film, Footprints (synopsis shown below) is available to you free from Snagfilms. Follow this link to see all of the featured […]

Science, Technology, Society & Environmental Education Research

Science, Technology, Society & Environmental (STSE) education has been an important part of science education curriculum development and research. STSE educators opened channels and alternative paths for teaching science in which context was seen as a more powerful starting point for learning. Although these researchers don’t use phrase “humanistic science,” others have synthesized the field […]

Science, Technology, Society & Environmental Education Research

Science, Technology, Society & Environmental (STSE) education has been an important part of science education curriculum development and research. STSE educators opened channels and alternative paths for teaching science in which context was seen as a more powerful starting point for learning. Although these researchers don’t use phrase “humanistic science,” others have synthesized the field […]

Science As Inquiry Website

This week, the 2nd Edition of Science As Inquiry will be published by Good Year Books. Science as Inquiry is based on the idea that learning is deepened if viewed as a communal experience, and that students are involved in making decisions about not only how they learn, but what they learn. Center stage in […]

Spongelab: A New Resource for Science Teachers

I received a message from Jeremy Friedberg, founder of Spongelab Interactive. It’s a powerful website, and is identified as a Global Science Community. You will find Games & Interactives, Animations, Graphics, and a section For Teachers. The site is “a game itself” and its puts you in charge of what you do on the site. […]

Ozone: An Inquiry into Air Quality

Atlanta leads the nation today in air quality—that is to say that it’s ozone forecast for today exceeds all other cities in the nation.  As shown in the AirNow map below, most of the Eastern part of the nation is in the moderate to USG ozone levels.  Moderate AQI (Air quality index) is 51 – 100. […]

Redesign of Art of Teaching Website

For more than 15 years, I’ve used websites to augment my teaching, research, and seminars.  The first website that I was a part of was for the Global Thinking Project, a hand across the globe environmental science program that linked schools enabling them to communicate with each other.  From there we designed websites for courses […]

How Does Student Motivation Factor into Assessing Student Achievement and Teacher Performance

For several days, I have been writing about the movement to standardize the curriculum, indeed, to develop a single set of standards for the entire nation—15,000 school districts. So far, Achieve.org has written the Common Core Standards in Mathematics and Reading, and by next year will have completed the New Generation of Science Standards. This […]

e-Readers & iPads: A Digital Learning Revolution?

There was an interesting article in USA Today raising questions about the use of e-readers, in particular, the iPad in higher education. Many of us who use these tools (right now my wife and I are on trip in the US Southwest & have with us an I-Book, an I-Pad, an I-Pad nano, and 2 […]

e-Readers & iPads: A Digital Learning Revolution?

There was an interesting article in USA Today raising questions about the use of e-readers, in particular, the iPad in higher education. Many of us who use these tools (right now my wife and I are on trip in the US Southwest & have with us an I-Book, an I-Pad, an I-Pad nano, and 2 […]

Top Blogs in Science Teaching

The Art of Teaching Science has been identified as one of 15 top science teaching blogs by Maria Magher’s blog.  We are very thrilled to be one of the weblogs on Maria’s list.  There you will find a collection of science teaching blogs that you might find relevant to your work.  I’ve visited all of […]

Education in the Age of Technology

I tuned into a lecture yesterday presented by Allan Collins which was hosted by The Learning Sciences Group at Penn State, and organized by Penn State Professor Richard Duschl.  The title of the talk was Rethinking Education in the Age of Technology, and is title of Collins’ book, co-authored with Richard Halverson.  The lecture is […]

Science Teaching in Film and Video

Last week I received emails from colleagues that believe that film and video make a strong contribution to the public understanding of science.  The three emails reflect as many ways that film and video are used in science education. The first email was from Dr. Bill Hammack, the Engineerguy at the University of Illinois.  I […]

Engineering as a Way to Humanize Science Teaching

In earlier posts I have talked about the humanistic science paradigm of learning, and have indicated that this paradigm has the potential of increasing the interest that students have in science, as well as helping students comprehend and understand science.  In one post I made this point: What has emerged in science education is a […]

Science Teaching at Botby Högstadieskolas: An Experiment in Teaching Science as an Optional Course

Would it be viable to offer science as an optional subject? What would happen to enrollment in science if it were an optional course? Would students sign up for such a course? How could the course be structured to interest students in wanting to take the course? In this post, I am going to feature […]

Images from the Art of Science Teaching Weblog

The Art of Science Teaching Weblog is a place to discuss issues related to science teaching.  In today’s post, you will find a link to a Youtube movie comprised of many of the images and pictures that I’ve used in previous posts. I hope you enjoy the images, and the music.

Images from NASA for Science Teaching

I received note from Jake Johnson, outreach coordinator, the Internet Archive Outreach, NASA images asking to mention a resource for teaching at the NASA Images website. I think you will find this site a powerful aid for teaching. Here are some examples:

That Historic Day When We Landed on the Moon & How an Australian Dish Saved the Day

Forty years ago, Neil Armstrong’s historic “one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind” comment as he stepped from the LEM onto the moon’s surface was watched by more than 600 million people (one fifth of mankind at the time).  Humankind almost didn’t see this historic event. Here is the unbelievable footage, recently […]

That Historic Day When We Landed on the Moon & How an Australian Dish Saved the Day

Forty years ago, Neil Armstrong’s historic “one small step for man; one giant leap for mankind” comment as he stepped from the LEM onto the moon’s surface was watched by more than 600 million people (one fifth of mankind at the time).  Humankind almost didn’t see this historic event. Here is the unbelievable footage, recently […]

Web 2.0 & Beyond: New Search Engines

As a science teacher, we’re always looking for new tools and strategies that will motivate, and help students learn science. Several days ago I introduced the idea of Science Teaching 3.0, and in that post suggested that there were parallel dimensions in consideration of globalization, the Earth, the Web. There was an interesting article at […]

Web 2.0 & Beyond: New Search Engines

As a science teacher, we’re always looking for new tools and strategies that will motivate, and help students learn science. Several days ago I introduced the idea of Science Teaching 3.0, and in that post suggested that there were parallel dimensions in consideration of globalization, the Earth, the Web. There was an interesting article at […]

Science & Education in the Economic Recovery & Reinvestment Bill: Some Details

Science education in general, and science teachers, in particular, have an important role in the Economic Recovery & Reinvestment Bill (ER&RB). According to the Committee on Appropriations, the ER&R Bill will target eight areas. As you scan the list, please note that science, technology & education are integral to the economic recovery. As you look […]

Science & Education in the Economic Recovery & Reinvestment Bill: Some Details

Science education in general, and science teachers, in particular, have an important role in the Economic Recovery & Reinvestment Bill (ER&RB). According to the Committee on Appropriations, the ER&R Bill will target eight areas. As you scan the list, please note that science, technology & education are integral to the economic recovery. As you look […]

Stimulating Innovation: The Key to Economic Recovery & Education Reform

The nation is about to embark on a path toward economic recovery and reinvestment in the future. I am confidant that we can do this. But to listen to some of the Governor’s these days, you would wonder what they are thinking, and why they are letting the citizens of their states down at the […]

Stimulating Innovation: The Key to Economic Recovery & Education Reform

The nation is about to embark on a path toward economic recovery and reinvestment in the future. I am confidant that we can do this. But to listen to some of the Governor’s these days, you would wonder what they are thinking, and why they are letting the citizens of their states down at the […]

Experiential Science Education: The Real Core of Teaching

Experiential education is not a new idea, and it certainly is not a new construct for science teachers, especially those teachers that involve their students in inquiry and problem-based learning.  However, experiential education has not at the top of the “to-do” list in the minds of many leaders and advocates for the No Child Left […]

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Change of Pace

The theme that I’ve been writing about is change, alternative paradigms for learning, and how change needs to happen in our schools and schooling. There is a good chance that I won’t be making posts over the next few days as I’ll be traveling to Lincoln, England for a week. However, if I wanted to […]

Kill Switch

In an earlier post I discussed Jonathan Zittrain’s concept of tethered, non-generative internet-based devices vs generative devices in his book The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It.  Zittrain was concerned that tethered devices, such as Apple’s iPhone (I have one) would result in more control by corporations over users of these devices, […]

iTunes U, Digital Media, & Teaching

Apple announced that iTunes supports iTunes U (iTunes University), which offers free audio and video content from universities, museums, public organizations, and other cultural institutions. This treasure trove of digital content, which can be accessed from a link on the iTunes store includes more than a dozen categories of content (engineering, health & medicine, history, […]

iTunes U, Digital Media, & Teaching

Apple announced that iTunes supports iTunes U (iTunes University), which offers free audio and video content from universities, museums, public organizations, and other cultural institutions. This treasure trove of digital content, which can be accessed from a link on the iTunes store includes more than a dozen categories of content (engineering, health & medicine, history, […]

An i-Phone Experience As a “Tethered” Non-Generative World Event

In Jonathan Zittrain’s book, The Future of the Internet, and How to Stop It, he identifies two patterns that describe the way the Internet can be used: generative or tethered.  The generative pattern exploits the open, flexible nature of the Internet and PC’s enabling tinkerers and innovators to create new ways to interact and work […]

An i-Phone Experience As a "Tethered" Non-Generative World Event

In Jonathan Zittrain’s book, The Future of the Internet, and How to Stop It, he identifies two patterns that describe the way the Internet can be used: generative or tethered.  The generative pattern exploits the open, flexible nature of the Internet and PC’s enabling tinkerers and innovators to create new ways to interact and work […]

Generative System of the Internet, Innovation & Thinking

In his book, The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It, Jonathan Zittrain compares and contrasts the generative and non-generative use of the Internet, and how decisions that are made now will influence the future of the net.  My own experience with the Internet began in 1979 with Compuserve, BRS After Dark, and […]

Generative System of the Internet, Innovation & Thinking

In his book, The Future of the Internet and How to Stop It, Jonathan Zittrain compares and contrasts the generative and non-generative use of the Internet, and how decisions that are made now will influence the future of the net.  My own experience with the Internet began in 1979 with Compuserve, BRS After Dark, and […]

How the Web was Won, and the New iPhone

This year is the 50th anniversary of the invention of the Internet, and during this year, Apple announced the “new” i-Phone 3G, and its new software for i-Phones and i-Pods, i-Phone 2.0.  An article in Vanity Fair magazine, How the Web Was Won, outlines the invention and development of the Internet through an oral history […]

Evolving Use of the Internet—Growing Up Digital

In the last post, I described two of my earlier experiences using the Internet to connect to information and people. Over the past two decades, the way digital media has changed, and how it is being used is truly astounding. Digital media in an Internet environment enables teachers to involve students in experiences that connect […]

First Experiences Using the Internet in Science Teaching

I had two real first experiences using the Internet. Here’s the first: I had purchased my first personal computer in 1980. It was an Apple II, which was invented by Steve Wozniak, the co-founder of Apple Computer. In his book, iWoz, Wozniak describes his unbelievable creativity in firstly inventing the Apple I, and followed soon […]

Web-Based Innovations for Science Teaching

In the next few posts I am going to talk about using the Internet in science teaching. In 1995, I published my first website for the Global Thinking Project, and ever since then, have been involved in developing websites for my own projects, and teaching others how to develop their own websites for teaching. Since […]

Authenticity as a Pathway to Humanistic Science Teaching

One of the serious issues related to contemporary science teaching is the dominance of traditional science teaching as defined by the rhetoric of standards-based science curriculum. Most students experience a science curriculum that is fundamentally didactic, rarely involving the students in authentic learning activities. The traditional model is overly mechanistic, individualistic, and focused on the […]

Citizen Scientists: Humanizing Science Teaching

There was an article in USA Today’s newspaper about citizen scientists that prompted this post. The article described Project BudBurst, a national field study that tracks the dates that 60 plant species leaf and flower this spring and summer. The purpose of the project is to involve citizens in collecting important climate change data on […]

Social Networking and Science Teaching

Tim Berners-Lee, the inventor of the World Wide Web had a dream for the web and he put it this way: “When I proposed the Web in 1989, the driving force I had in mind was communication through shared knowledge, and the driving market for it was collaboration among people at work and at home.” […]

The Value of Student-to-Student Exchanges

For nearly 20 years, I was involved with a project that started in the 1980’s with people to people exchanges between educators and psychologists in North America with colleagues in the Soviet Union. We made annual visits and conducted seminar-type sessions with schools, universities and research institutes. After several visits, we started an exchange program […]

A New Look for The Art of Teaching Science

I’ve changed the Word Press Theme for my site, and I hope you like the new look. It’s called Neptune, and reflects the content of the site more closely in that we talk about science and science education. The theme is cleaner than the previous theme that I used, and I hope will be easier […]

Activity on this Blog—Past Two Months

Although I started this science teaching blog more than a year ago, it wasn’t until June 16, 2006 that I installed a page counter (site statistics) to give me an idea how many people were hitting the site, and what pages were hit more frequently than others. First, I was surprised that the site received […]

Computer Backlash? How about a classroom revolution!

Four nearly 20 years, my colleagues and I were involved in using technology to enhance teaching and learning not only at the university level, but at the K-12 level as well. We wanted to use computers to enhance active learning in the classroom, and to find ways to help students engage in collaborative scientific research […]

Hurricane Katrina: A Citizen Resource

The devastation of Hurricane Katrina was beyond belief, and might be the worst natural disaster in US history. Natural disasters, such as hurricanes, earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, floods, and other severe storms have impacted more than 2.2 billion people in the past 10 years. This is a very large increase from the previous ten years, and […]

Change is Difficult

In Cobb County Georgia, the school district’s administration proposed in February to provide an iBook (Apple Computer Co.) for every teacher and students, grades 6 -12. It would have been a major transformation in the way education would be implemented in the district. Cobb is the 2nd largest school district in Georgia. The proposal would […]

Tale of Two Conferences

Tale of Two-Conferences, one for Educators, One for Newspaper Editors Since I’m from Boston, but have lived in metro-Atlanta area for 36 years, I wondered what all the fuss was about when I read the headlines in the last two editions of the Marietta Daily Journal (MDJ), “Redden sends 54 Educators to Boston (7/19/05) and […]

No Paradigm Shift in Cobb County, Georgia

In Cobb County, Georgia’s second largest school district (just outside Atlanta), the district superintendent and school board have initiated the Power to Learn Project. Power to Learn will put an i-book in the hands of every student grades 6-12, as well as every K-12 teacher. The total cost of the project will be $100 million. […]

Using the Web to Transform Learning Possibilities

Fifteen years ago, a team of educators from Georgia took 6 Macintosh SE 20 computers, modems, and printers to the then Soviet Union, and then proceeded to install one computer, modem and printer in five different schools we were collaborating with (2 in Moscow and 3 in St. Petersburg). We connected each computer to a […]

The Case of iBooks in Cobb County Schools

This is the county in Georgia where I reside. I followed the story in the local newspaper on the Cobb County School District’s decision to provide Apple i-Books for all teachers, and students in grades 6 -12, beginning with an experiemental phase beginning next school year in four of the district’s high schools. It created […]

Web-Based Teaching, Just Another Fad?

Jerry Squire, a twenty-year veteran science teacher in a midwestern urban high school, was sitting in the audience at a staff development conference listening to a speaker from a science education research and development center present ideas about the benefits of online or Web-based teaching and learning. The speaker, a very well-known science educator, indicated […]