“Deans for Impact”: A Potential, “Teacher-prep Charter” Petri Dish?

The post that follows is a re-blog from Mercedes Schneider’s blog.  It documents yet another step in the corportization of U.S. Education–this one is directed at teacher preparation. Many education deans have signed up and joined a group called the Deans for Impact.  I am curious how many of the teacher education faculty at these schools are […]

Is @TeachForAmerica Cloaking Inequity?: Discussing the Headwind

Professor Julian Vasquez Heilig, author of the blog, Cloaking Inequity, provides an important look into the nature of Teach for America, and why it is not the way teachers for our schools should be prepared, or hired.  He writes: After several decades, Teach For America, a program that sends inexperienced teachers (typically only 5 weeks […]

An Inquiry into the National Council on Teacher Quality

The Devil is in the Detail This inquiry is an investigation into the behavior of two organizations that claim to have the inside track on understanding how teachers should be educated: The National Council on Teacher Quality, and it’s partner and founding organization, the Thomas B. Fordham Institute.  The findings are published and available as an eBook […]

NCTQ Review on Teacher Prep Replete with Significant Data Gaps

According to the NCTQ, teacher preparation in the U.S. is failing, and again according to them, there is a significant data gap on what’s working. Their stated goal is to fill this gap by providing those who want to be teachers to become “strategic” consumers by providing them with a ranking of the teacher prep […]

Resisting the National Council on Teacher Quality’s Propaganda

The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) has published in recent review of teacher preparation.  The NCTQ is well-financed (Gates, Walton, Broad, New Ventures Fund, and many more), and the Fordham Foundation’s creation.  Together, their goal is destroy teacher prep by convincing the nation that teacher preparation in the nations public and private colleges is failing.  And […]

The NCTQ Review of Teacher Prep in the University System of Georgia is Feeble & Incompetent

The NCTQ Review of Teacher Prep in the University System of Georgia is Feeble & Incompetent. In this post I’m going to explain why I conclude that the NCTQ Review of Teacher Prep of the University System of Georgia colleges and universities that offer teacher education is feeble & incompetent. I am Professor Emeritus of […]

National Council for Teacher Quality Teacher Prep Review: A Stacked Deck?

National Council for Teacher Quality Review: A Stacked Deck?  In this post I am going to show that the make up of the NCTQ review of teacher prep panels represents a “stacked deck.”  Instead of working with teacher educators directly, the NCTQ uses deceptive and inadequate methods to investigate teacher prep. Who are these people who […]

Are the Deep Pockets of Gates, Walton, and Broad Contrary to the Ideals of Education in a Democracy?

Latest Story According to the Foundation Center, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and the Eli & Edythe Broad Foundation are ranked 1, 13, and 38 respectively on the top 100 U.S. foundations by total giving.  The total assets of these three foundations as of April 2014 was $37 billion for the Gates […]

Teacher Educators are Teachers First by Practicing What They Teach

Teacher Educators are Teachers First by Practicing what they Teach. This is the first of several posts that will be published here about the art of teacher education.  There is a rich body of research on teacher education, and I will make use of recent work that shows that teacher education is a vibrant and […]

What Sort of Teacher Preparation Programs Does the Gates Foundation Support?

Did you know that between 2008 and 2013, The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation provided more than $37 million in funding for teacher preparation projects? What sort of teacher preparation programs does the Gates Foundation support? Only 8% of these funds were awarded to university teacher education programs. Ninety-two percent of the grant money was […]

What is Georgia's Race to the Top Plan for New Teachers?

What is the Georgia Race to the Top (RT3) Plan for New Teachers? Teach for America The simple answer is to hire inexperienced and uncertified teachers through contractual arrangements with Teach for America, a political action organization that provides boot camp summer training for college graduates from élite universities.  After five weeks of training, with […]

What is Georgia’s Race to the Top Plan for New Teachers?

What is the Georgia Race to the Top (RT3) Plan for New Teachers? Teach for America The simple answer is to hire inexperienced and uncertified teachers through contractual arrangements with Teach for America, a political action organization that provides boot camp summer training for college graduates from élite universities.  After five weeks of training, with […]

How Georgia Could Turn Around Turnaround Schools

Georgia, like other states, has identified schools whose students and teachers have been labeled failures on the basis of high-stakes tests. These tests measure the narrowest and possibly the least important aspects of schooling, namely the ability to answer multiple choice questions on the lowest level of content in math, or science, social studies or […]

Georgia's Turnaround Plan: Hire TFA and TNTP Cadets

Like all states that were winners in the Race to the Top (RT3) competition, Georgia’s scope of work entails four “project” areas: (1) standards and assessment (2) data systems (3) great teachers and leaders and (4) turn around the lowest achieving schools. In this post, I am going to look at the fourth goal of […]

Georgia’s Turnaround Plan: Hire TFA and TNTP Cadets

Like all states that were winners in the Race to the Top (RT3) competition, Georgia’s scope of work entails four “project” areas: (1) standards and assessment (2) data systems (3) great teachers and leaders and (4) turn around the lowest achieving schools. In this post, I am going to look at the fourth goal of […]

Is Inquiry The Magnum Principium of Teaching?

Seventh Article in the Series, The Artistry of Teaching Is Inquiry the Magnum Principium of Teaching?  If it is, what is it and how does it help us understand teaching, especially if we want to explore artistry in teaching. In our view inquiry is the sin qua non of experiential teaching and learning.  When teachers […]

The Art of Mingling Practice and Theory in Teaching

This article is the Fourth in a series on The Artistry of Teaching.   In 1896, the laboratory school of the University of Chicago opened its doors under the directorship of John Dewey (Fishman and McCarthy 1998).  Dewey’s idea was to create an environment for social and pedagogical experimentation.  Theory and practice should mingle, and […]

What's the Formula for Designing Rigorous Standards for Teacher Preparation?

What’s the Formula for Designing Rigorous Standards for Teacher Preparation? Read on to find out. The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) published recommendations for Accreditation Standards and Evidence: Aspirations for Educator Preparation.  According to the CAEP website, “July 1, 2013, marked the de facto consolidation of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and […]

What’s the Formula for Designing Rigorous Standards for Teacher Preparation?

What’s the Formula for Designing Rigorous Standards for Teacher Preparation? Read on to find out. The Council for the Accreditation of Educator Preparation (CAEP) published recommendations for Accreditation Standards and Evidence: Aspirations for Educator Preparation.  According to the CAEP website, “July 1, 2013, marked the de facto consolidation of the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and […]

Results Are In: NCTQ Report on Teacher Prep Rated with Four Cautions

In the last four posts, I have written articles that call out the National Council on Teacher Quality on the basis of their built-in bias against teacher preparation institutions, and their confrontational style of what they call research. In the last post I used research by Michael Carolan, who investigated when does science become junk.  In […]

Is the NCTQ Report on Teacher Prep Junk Science?

In this post I am going to look at the question Is the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) Report on Teacher Prep Junk Science?  In my last post, I suggested that the NCTQ report on teacher preparation is an example of junk science.   Matthew Weinstein, professor of education at Kent State University commented on […]

NCTQ Report on Teacher Prep: the Devil is in the Detail

NCTQ Report on Teacher Prep: the Devil is in the Detail. I decided to read the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) Report on Teacher Prep to try to learn what the NCTQ had to say about teacher prep in the U.S. Last week, the National Council on Teacher Quality released its report on Teacher […]

Warning: If You Believe the Fordham Foundation on Their View of Science or NCTQ's View on Teacher Education, You Should Check Your Eyesight. Really.

Warning: If You Believe the Fordham Foundation on Their View of Science or NCTQ’s View on Teacher Education, You Should Check Your Eyesight.  Really. On this blog, I have reviewed earlier reports put out by these two oxymoronic organizations, the Thomas Fordham Institute: Advancing Education Excellence (Fordham), and The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ).  You need to […]

Warning: If You Believe the Fordham Foundation on Their View of Science or NCTQ’s View on Teacher Education, You Should Check Your Eyesight. Really.

Warning: If You Believe the Fordham Foundation on Their View of Science or NCTQ’s View on Teacher Education, You Should Check Your Eyesight.  Really. On this blog, I have reviewed earlier reports put out by these two oxymoronic organizations, the Thomas Fordham Institute: Advancing Education Excellence (Fordham), and The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ).  You need to […]

What Everybody Ought to Know About Teaching

In this post I am going to share some thinking about teaching that I learned along my journey as a teacher from three people.  I future posts I’ll share thoughts about teaching from other people who I’ve met along the way. What everybody ought to know about teaching is a response to what Henry Giroux […]

Assault on Teacher Education

The National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) is leading the assault on teacher education in the U.S. According to the President of this organization “Ed schools don’t give teachers the tools they need.” NCTQ’s president, Kate Walsh, has led the assault  claiming that teacher education has no real authority because it lacks specialized knowledge. She […]

We Teach Science Not Because It Nurtures the Child's Imagination, but Because It Might Help Get a Job

Reform in science education for the past two decades is based on the ideas that American students receive an inferior education in mathematics and science, and as a result will not be able to compete for jobs in the global marketplace.  In this scenario, the purpose for teaching math and science is to get a […]

We Teach Science Not Because It Nurtures the Child’s Imagination, but Because It Might Help Get a Job

Reform in science education for the past two decades is based on the ideas that American students receive an inferior education in mathematics and science, and as a result will not be able to compete for jobs in the global marketplace.  In this scenario, the purpose for teaching math and science is to get a […]

¿Is it Not Possible to Charter Teachers for a Change?

¿Is it not possible that if teachers were chartered to design curriculum and assessment methods geared to their own students they might provide an education that is closer to the lived experiences of their student?  ¿Is is possible that by enabling teachers to carry out their work as professionals the way most of them are […]

Anthony Cody: Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: How Do We Build the Teaching Profession?

Guest Post by Anthony Cody Note: This is the first of five posts on the dialog between Anthony Cody and his readers, and the Gates Foundation.  This post was originally published on Anthony’s site over on Education Week Teacher.  This dialog is a major contribution to educational reform.  Anthony Cody is one of the leading […]

Anthony Cody: Dialogue With the Gates Foundation: How Do We Build the Teaching Profession?

Guest Post by Anthony Cody Note: This is the first of five posts on the dialog between Anthony Cody and his readers, and the Gates Foundation.  This post was originally published on Anthony’s site over on Education Week Teacher.  This dialog is a major contribution to educational reform.  Anthony Cody is one of the leading […]

The Hip-Hop Generation: Implications for Teacher Preparation

The current wave of reform in science education, including teacher preparation, is not in the best interests of the diverse cultures that make up the population of the United States. The reform is standards- and test-based, and seeks to create schooling that ignores differences in people, and instead creates an outline (read that “standards”) of what is to […]

Why Teacher Education is Important and How to Make It Better

Teacher education is more important today than it has been in half a century.  Education policy and practice are being radically transformed in American education, and teacher preparation programs in colleges and universities are being pressured to fall in line with the marketization and privatization of K-12 schools.  In teacher preparation this is evident by […]

NCTQ Prepares its Hit on Schools of Education

Guest Post by Anthony Cody Our political system has deteriorated to such a degree that policymaking in the education arena has come to resemble the selection of “hits” chosen for airplay by 1950s DJs. Back in the day, the main mode of advertising to promote the sale of records was to have the songs played […]

NCTQ Study of Assessment in Teacher Preparation Courses Flunks

In May, 2012, the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) issued a report entitled: What Teacher Education Programs Teach About K – 12 Assessment.   Anthony Cody mentioned this study in a recent post entitled Payola Policy: NCTQ Prepares its Hit on Schools of Education. The title intrigued me, so I went over to the NCTQ website, and read […]

The Predicted Effects of the Common Core: Implications for Next Generation Science Standards

According to Achieve, the U.S. system of science and mathematics education is performing  below par, and if something isn’t done, then millions of students will not be prepared to compete in the global economy.  Achieve cites achievement data from PISA and NAEP to make its case that American science and mathematics teaching is in horrible […]

Guest Post by Ingvar Stål: Humanistic Science Inquiry-Oriented Teaching in Finland

Note: This is the second post by Dr. Ingvar Stål, Senior lecturer in physics, chemistry, and science at the Botby Junior High School. In his first post, which you can read here, Dr. Stål gave us an overview of the Finnish educational system, which provides a basic education to all Finnish citizens ages 7 to 16, as well as […]

How Standards are like Brick Walls in the face of Teaching and Learning

Note:  This is the fourth article in a series on the consequences of the authoritarian standards & high-stakes testing. Randy Pausch, author of The Last Lecture, suggested that brick walls are there for a reason.  The brick walls are not there to keep us out; the brick walls are there to give us a chance […]

Quality Teaching: We’re Looking in the Wrong Places

According to a number of researchers (Marder, Ravitch, Darling-Hammond) our system of education is failing a huge number of students, especially in mathematics, and science.  Since 2003, when the NCLB Act was put into place that required schools to test all students beginning in grade 3, the Federal control by the U.S. Department of Eduction […]

Quality Teaching: We're Looking in the Wrong Places

According to a number of researchers (Marder, Ravitch, Darling-Hammond) our system of education is failing a huge number of students, especially in mathematics, and science.  Since 2003, when the NCLB Act was put into place that required schools to test all students beginning in grade 3, the Federal control by the U.S. Department of Eduction […]

Teach for America: A Closer Look: Part 2

Part 2.  You can read Part 1 here. A Closer Look at Teach for America Teach for America is a program that recruits hundreds of teachers each year, gives them a four-week boot-camp style summer program, and then places them in school districts in which TFA has contractual agreements.  School systems need to agree to […]

Teach for America Needs to Evolve to a Realistic Teacher Education Program: Part 1

There are two parts to this discussion which examines why I think Teach for America needs to evolve to a realistic teacher education program, and not continue putting uncertified and according to the research not as effective as certified teachers in America’s classrooms. Here is Part 1.  You can read Part 2 here. Snubbing Teaching […]

Phil Kovacs Responds to the Latest Research on Teach For America

Guest Post by Dr. Philip Kovacs This post was published on Anthony Cody’s Living in Dialogue blog on Education Week as a response to guest post  that I wrote entitled  Cobb County, Georgia, Rejects Teach For America. One cogent comment came from Stuart (EdOutsider), who wrote the following: Listen, all this slapping our own backs […]

Teach for America Rejected in Georgia’s Cobb School System

Cobb County, Georgia’s second largest school decided not to consider the superintendant’s request to hire 50 Teach for America (TFA) non certified college graduates to work in under-performing schools in South Cobb.  According to an editorial in the Marietta Daily Journal,  Dr. Michael Hinojosa, the county’s new superintendent (formerly superintendent of the Dallas ISD) had […]

Teach for America Rejected in Georgia's Cobb School System

Cobb County, Georgia’s second largest school decided not to consider the superintendant’s request to hire 50 Teach for America (TFA) non certified college graduates to work in under-performing schools in South Cobb.  According to an editorial in the Marietta Daily Journal,  Dr. Michael Hinojosa, the county’s new superintendent (formerly superintendent of the Dallas ISD) had […]

First Art of Science Teaching eBook Published

The first in a series of science education eBooks was published today.  The title is Why Do We Teach Science?  You can access the eBook at the link on the top menu, or follow this link. Why do we teach science? is the first of a series of science education eBooks that will be published, and made available […]

Science Teaching eBooks from the Art of Teaching Science Are Coming Soon

Science Teaching eBooks, based on articles and posts in The Art of Teaching Science will be available soon on this blog. From “Is it Pedagogy or Petrology: How To Teach Science Real Good“, to “Why do we teach science, anyway?” these eBooks will explore topics that have rated high on the blog, and have shown reader […]

The 5 Essential Elements of Artistry in Science Teaching

As the title of this blog reminds us, teaching is an art, and in that respect, let take a look at the “art of teaching science.” Since many of us believe that teaching is an art, there is really no formula for effective teaching.  But there are some elements or as Mike Dias and I […]

The 5 Essential Elements of Artistry in Science Teaching

As the title of this blog reminds us, teaching is an art, and in that respect, let take a look at the “art of teaching science.” Since many of us believe that teaching is an art, there is really no formula for effective teaching.  But there are some elements or as Mike Dias and I […]

4 Aspects of the Artistry of Science Teaching

In our view, teaching is professional artistry.  As such, not only is your work as a science teacher an artistic one, but the way teachers are educated should also embrace professional artistry. Many years ago, I was working on a book with Joe Abruscato entitled The Whole Cosmos Catalog of Science Activities, and during this […]

10 Hall of Fame Teachers

Lori Kobelan emailed me linking me to Education Hall of Fame: 10 Teachers who made history. Throughout our experience as a student, we all had at least one “hall of fame” teacher, a teacher that inspired us, believed in us, and showed us the way out of the woods. Here is the list and a […]

Science-As-Inquiry, 2nd Edition, Published

Science-as-Inquiry, 2nd Edition has been published by Good Year Books.  It is available for purchase here.  The text that follows the image of the book is part of the Introduction of the book. Science As Inquiry, 2nd Edition weaves together ideas about science teaching and inquiry that were developed over many years of work with practicing […]

Science As Inquiry Website

This week, the 2nd Edition of Science As Inquiry will be published by Good Year Books. Science as Inquiry is based on the idea that learning is deepened if viewed as a communal experience, and that students are involved in making decisions about not only how they learn, but what they learn. Center stage in […]

Science Teaching: A Dilemma in Any Language

Depending upon the language you use the phrase “science teaching,” it conjures up different meanings and attitudes in the minds of our youth. In some cultures, science classes do not rate very high among students, although at the same time, they will assure you that science is important in the lives of its citizens. In […]

Bill Gates has all the Anwers: Just Ask Him

There are two articles that you might want to read either before or after you read this post. The first article was in the New York Times and is entitled: Teacher Ratings get a New Look, Pushed by a Rich Watcher.  The other article is actually a blog post and is entitled Bill Gates Listens […]

Why Do We Teach Science? The Skills Argument

In the last two posts, the economic and democratic arguments have been discussed, respectively.  We now turn to a third argument, the “skills argument.” According to R. Stephen Turner, the “skills argument” is second to the economic argument as the reason we teach science. According to Turner, the skills argument provides the rationale that the study […]

Teaching in America: It Should Not Be About Winning

There was an opinion piece in the New York Times on Sunday by Thomas Friedman entitled Teaching for America. On the front page on the Times website, the article title was Teaching to Win. Friedman’s article is supportive of current reform efforts, and the charge that the nations schools have put us in a hole […]

The Dinosaur Footprint Puzzle: A Content or Process Approach?

“Tracking the Footprints Puzzle: The problematic persistence of science-as-process in teaching the nature and culture of science” by Charles R. Ault, Jr. and Jeff Dodick, which was published this month in the journal Science Education, is the research basis for this post.  The article was especially interesting for me since I have used the Footprint […]

Mentoring Science Teachers

Perhaps one of the most important roles that science teachers play, apart from helping their students become excited about and learn science, is being a mentor to an apprentice or beginning teacher.   My own experience in the mentoring process was as a beginning teacher at Weston High School where I was mentored by Irv […]

Science Teaching Fellowships

I received an email from the Knowles Science Teaching Foundation announcing that they are now accepting applications for its prestigious KSTF Teaching Fellowships. Renewable for up to five years and valued at up to $150,000, the highly competitive Fellowships support America’s best and brightest teachers of high school mathematics and science at the critical early juncture […]

If Science Courses Were Optional, Would Students Enroll?

Yesterday I wrote about the drive to “standardize” curriculum in the U.S. through the implementation of Common Core Standards.  Already, we have the Common Core Standards in Mathematics and Reading, and National Research Council has hired Achieve (the same organization that wrote the Math and Reading standards) to write the new generation of science standards. […]

Humanizing Science Teacher Education

Last week this question appeared on the NARST (National Association for Research in Science Teaching) Discussion List: Can anyone suggest a resource (or resources) that addresses the problem of how to engage resistant in-service science teachers to experiment with more reform oriented instructional practices? Ideally there would be practical suggestions for instructional coaches (or other […]

Blue Print for Education Sent to Congress

The U.S. Department of Education has released and sent to Congress the document entitled A Blueprint for Reform: The Reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.  You can read the Education Week article that focuses on key points in the Reauthorization. The 45 page Blueprint is organized into the following sections: Priorities in a […]

Dear Mr. President: Take the Risk, and Try and Humanize Teaching and Learning

Tomorrow, President Obama will send his education blue print to Congress, which, according to the New York Times article, “strikes a careful balance, retaining some key features of the Bush-era law, including its requirement for annual reading and math tests, while proposing far-reaching changes.” The blue print is really no different than what was put […]

Using Fear to Attack Teachers and Hold Schools Hostage

This week’s Newsweek magazine included three lead articles entitled Why we can’t get rid of failing teachers?, Schoolyard Brawl, and Blackboard Jungle. The next day, Teacher Magazine featured an online discussion related to these articles entitled Is Firing Bad Teachers the Answer? The discussion on the Teacher Magazine website encouraged readers to share their opinions […]

Three Ways to Interest Students in Science

Perhaps the fundamental goal of science education should be finding ways to interest students in science.  Stephen Hornstra Landgraaf, (The Netherlands) made this statement as part of his comment in my previous post.  In this era of standards-based education we leave most students outside of science, and do little to bring them in to see […]

Science Education Conference, Istanbul, Turkey: September 2009

One of the posts that I made last October was the announcement of a science education research conference that will be held in Istanbul, Turkey, August 31 – September 4, 2009.  I head from many colleagues, especially science educators in Africa and the Middle East who indicated strong interest in attending the conference.  All of […]

Dear Mr. President: The Need for Meaningful Reform in Science Teaching

We know you have a lot on your plate—a deep recession, two wars in the Middle East, health care reform, extreme partisanship, the fast spreading swine flu. Yet the one area that that is essential to our well being as a nation–education–has yet to become center stage. I know it is a high priority of […]

The Artistry of Science Teaching: It isn't enough to simply boost beginning teachers' pay!

I want to follow up from yesterday’s discussion of Georgia’s plan to boost beginning science teachers pay.  I am prompted to do so because of the compelling comment on yesterday’s post by Quin Harrell.  Here is how he began his comment: While I agree with pay increases for math and science teachers, I totally disagree […]

The Artistry of Science Teaching: It isn’t enough to simply boost beginning teachers’ pay!

I want to follow up from yesterday’s discussion of Georgia’s plan to boost beginning science teachers pay.  I am prompted to do so because of the compelling comment on yesterday’s post by Quin Harrell.  Here is how he began his comment: While I agree with pay increases for math and science teachers, I totally disagree […]

Is student science achievement the measure of teacher effectiveness?

The short, and the long answer to this is no. Of course I framed the question using the phrase “the measure of teacher effectiveness.”  Why do I bring this topic up for discussion on this blog.  In America there is a lot of talk about educational reform, especially from President Obama and the new Secretary […]

Freedom to Change & Transform the Practice of Science Teaching

Carl Rogers wrote a book many years ago entitled Freedom to Learn.  One of the most significant chapters in his book was “My way of facilitating a class.”  I read this chapter many times, and it had a profound influence on the way that I facilitated my classes at Georgia State University.  As a result […]

Freedom to Change & Transform the Practice of Science Teaching

Carl Rogers wrote a book many years ago entitled Freedom to Learn.  One of the most significant chapters in his book was “My way of facilitating a class.”  I read this chapter many times, and it had a profound influence on the way that I facilitated my classes at Georgia State University.  As a result […]

Adventures in Geology–Is it pedagogy or petrology? Transforming Practice

In the last two posts, I’ve discussed the recent research that focuses on girls and science, and how teachers can make transformations in their practice to incorporate recent research.  Making a transformation in ones teaching is challenging and indeed a creative adventure. In the 1970s I was teaching an undergraduate geology course at Georgia State […]

Transforming Science Teaching Practice

In last post, which explored recent research on girls and science, I ended the entry with the notion that helping teachers transform their practice to incorporate new findings and theories about students, feminist perspectives and learning theory will determine the extent to which progress is made in furthering the participation of girls in science and […]

Science Curriculum—A Global Perspective

In this post I want to announce a new website entitled: Science Curriculum—A Global Perspective. In the last two posts I alluded to science teaching from a global perspective.  In the first of these two posts, entitled Infusing Global Thinking into science teaching, I discussed some examples of how educators have developed programs that infuse […]

Career Changers: Attracting People to Science Teaching

Change is on the minds of everyone these days.  Mike Dias sent me a news release that originated from the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship Foundation, entitled “National Survey Identifies Incentives To Attract Talented Career Changers into America’s Classrooms.”  According to the news release, career changers might be the best way to solve the problem of finding 1.5 […]