The Principle of Tolerance: Curing Ourselves of the Itch for Absolute Knowledge & Power

The Principle of Tolerance: Curing Ourselves of the Itch for Absolute Knowledge & Power I beseech you, in the bowels of Christ: Think it possible you may be mistaken.’ We have to cure ourselves of the itch for absolute knowledge and power. We have to close the distance between the push-button order and the human […]

With Billionaires in the White House We Need to Keep an Eye on the Money

With Billionaires in the White House We Need to Keep an Eye on the Money It’s been reported that the Authoritarian wants to increase the Pentagon’s share of the Federal budget by 10% which translates to about $59 billion more dollars.  A report has circulated that the EPA will be cut by at least 20%, […]

How Could We?

How Could We? Like many of you I’ve spent the day after mourning for our country and the people who have been abused and threatened by the man who was elected over one of the bravest women that we could have had for our President. How could we? How could we elect the bully? How could […]

Georgia’s Misfortunate School District

Georgia’s Misfortunate School District I’ve been away pursuing other projects, but now is the time for all of us to open our eyes about a plan to turn struggling schools into a pet project of the Georgia Governor. In November when we vote to pick a new president (topic for a future post), citizens in […]

The A Bomb

The first day I went to school was September 5, 1945.  On that day, I walked about a mile to the East Natick Elementary School in Massachusetts.  Three days earlier, on September 2, Japan surrendered and World II came to an end.  But on July 16, the first atomic bomb was detonated in New Mexico, and […]

Can EcoJustice, Citizen Science and Youth Activism Inspire New Ways of Teaching Science?

EcoJustice, Citizen Science and Youth Activism  (Library Copy) is the title of a new book edited by Michael P. Mueller, University of Alaska, and Deborah J. Tippins, University of Georgia.  It’s the first in the new Springer Book Series Environmental Discourses in Science Education in trying to bridge environmental education with science education. I received my […]

Atlanta Public Schools’ Equity Audit Finds Differences! by Ed Johnson

Guest Letter by Mr. Ed Johnson, Advocate for Education, Atlanta, GA Ed Johnson wrote a letter in response to the Atlanta Public Schools Equity Audit which was prepared by researchers at Georgia State University to look at differences in the characteristics across schools in the APS district.  As you will see in Ed Johnson’s letter, […]

Common Core Protest Poster by Joyce Murdock Feilke

Joyce Murdock Feilke has created and published this poster, that came about from her experiences in Austin, Texas as a Texas School Counselor.  In several earlier posts, her experiences were featured on this blog, and you can read about them here. The powerful message of this poster is clear in these words, but more evident […]

A Vanguard of Voices for Educational Reform–Updated

I started this blog in 2005 to augment my book The Art of Teaching Science (Public Library), and to write about progressive & humanistic science teaching.   Over the years it morphed into a blog that not only explores science education, but its more of a discussion of the unnerving intrusion of corporate education-wannabes with […]

Psychological Abuse: A Springtime School Ritual?

  It might seem extreme to you for me to write about the psychological abuse of children in schools. However, at the end of the post, I hope you will understand why I did. Although the content of this post might seem to some to be controversial, I believe that the content warrants being stated, […]

Should Parents REFUSE to Allow Their Children to be Given the Georgia CRCT Test?

  It seems as if one Georgia couple says yes. In Marietta, a Georgia a couple has refused to allow their children at the West Side Elementary school to take the high-stakes Criterion Referenced Competency Test (CRCT). These parents informed the school’s principal two days before the testing period that their third and fifth graders would […]

How is High-Stakes Testing Related to Child Labor in the U.S.?

  Reblogged from Stop the CRCT Madness by Stephanie Jones.  Dr. Jones’ research engages the intersections of social class, gender, and race with language, literacies, and educational equity with a particular interest in social class and poverty.  You can follow her on her blog Engaged Intellectuals. Context for Dr. Jones’ Article on Child Labor I […]

Will the Atlanta Public Schools Make Foolish or Wise Decisions?

I found this poster while reading over on Dustin Stout’s amazing work on creative design and social media. Dustin was reminded of this Bertrand Russell quote by a colleague, and superimposed it on a photo to make this Russell poster. Russell’s Fools, fanatics and wise men quote resonated with the most recent posts on this […]

Andrew Young Speaks Out at the Trial of Beverly Hall: Good!

  Andrew Young, former mayor of Atlanta, U.N. Ambassador, and civil rights leader, was in attendance at the trial of Dr. Beverly Hall, former superintendent of the Atlanta Public Schools. The purpose of the session was to hear arguments from both sides whether to grant a delay in the trial of Dr. Hall because of […]

Why Is the Atlanta School Board Accepting Only One Nominee for Superintendent?

  Atlanta is an important city, not only for those of who live here, but for the state of Georgia, and the nation. It is home to many  universities, churches, the Martin Luther King Center for Social Change, The Carter Center, the Center for Disease Control, and home to more than 453,000 citizens in the […]

Changing Public Education from the Ground UP: The Network for Public Education

Latest Story The first conference of The Network for Public Education (NPE) will be held this weekend at the University of Texas.  NPE, formed by Diane Ravitch,  is an advocacy group whose goal is to protect, preserve, and strengthen public education. The March 1 – 2 conference will include keynote addresses, panels and workshops. The […]

NBC's Climate Debate: Enabling the Deniers

On NBC’s Feb. 16 edition of Meet the Press a “debate” was broadcast between Bill Nye, the Science Guy, Marsha Blackburn, a Republican Rep. from Tennessee and David Gregory, the media enabler. On the one hand, its unfortunate that Bill Nye agreed to go on the program and acknowledge by his presence that global warming […]

NBC’s Climate Debate: Enabling the Deniers

On NBC’s Feb. 16 edition of Meet the Press a “debate” was broadcast between Bill Nye, the Science Guy, Marsha Blackburn, a Republican Rep. from Tennessee and David Gregory, the media enabler. On the one hand, its unfortunate that Bill Nye agreed to go on the program and acknowledge by his presence that global warming […]

A Story of Global Inquiry in Action

Eighth Article in the Series, Artistry in Teaching In this article I am going talk about a project that grew out of personal and professional relationships among teachers from different countries.  Through reciprocal exchanges among educators in U.S. (most of whom where from schools in Georgia) and Russia (most of whom were from Moscow, Pushchino […]

The Wisdom of Practice

Latest Article on the Artistry of Teaching Around 1990, I started working on a research project which was published as a book entitled Minds on Science (library copy). I was interested in exploring teaching from a humanistic and progressive point of view. One aspect of this project was to include “wisdom-of-practice” interviews with teachers that […]

Guest Post by Ed Johnson: The Next Atlanta Superintendent: Seeking Someone Who Embraces Unconventional Possibilities

Guest Post by Ed Johnson This post is a letter written by Ed Johnson, an advocate and citizen for improving education in the Atlanta Public Schools. This letter is especially timely in light of the consequences of the Atlanta and State of Georgia testing debacle. Although Atlanta has a superintendent, his term will end in […]

School Closings: What's the Lesson Here?

In the last post on this blog, in which I argued it was a mistake for large districts like Chicago to carry out mass school closings, readers expressed strong opinions on the issue of closure. The post was also published on Anthony Cody’s blog, Living in Dialog over on Education Week, and you can read […]

School Closings: What’s the Lesson Here?

In the last post on this blog, in which I argued it was a mistake for large districts like Chicago to carry out mass school closings, readers expressed strong opinions on the issue of closure. The post was also published on Anthony Cody’s blog, Living in Dialog over on Education Week, and you can read […]

Bill Moyers Interviews "Activist" Zack Kopplin About Science Teaching

Zack Kopplin is an American science education activist.  While he was a high school student at Baton Rouge Magnet High School, the Louisiana legislature passed the Louisiana Science Education Act  signed by Governor Bobby Jindal.  Zack Kopplin, who is now a history major at Rice University was very surprised that Governor Jindal signed this anti-science […]

Bill Moyers Interviews “Activist” Zack Kopplin About Science Teaching

Zack Kopplin is an American science education activist.  While he was a high school student at Baton Rouge Magnet High School, the Louisiana legislature passed the Louisiana Science Education Act  signed by Governor Bobby Jindal.  Zack Kopplin, who is now a history major at Rice University was very surprised that Governor Jindal signed this anti-science […]

Education Secretary Duncan on the TIMSS Results: We're Being Out-Educated & Out-Competed

If you go over to the U.S. Department of Education website, you will find the Secretary Arne Duncan’s statement on the release of the 2011 TIMSS and PIRLS assessment.  You can read it online here, and I’ve copied it and posted it below.  Highlighted (my own) words describe the essence of Mr. Duncan’s view of […]

Education Secretary Duncan on the TIMSS Results: We’re Being Out-Educated & Out-Competed

If you go over to the U.S. Department of Education website, you will find the Secretary Arne Duncan’s statement on the release of the 2011 TIMSS and PIRLS assessment.  You can read it online here, and I’ve copied it and posted it below.  Highlighted (my own) words describe the essence of Mr. Duncan’s view of […]

The Battle for Control of Higher Education in Florida

Florida Republican lawmakers, including the Governor, are setting their sights on extending the corporate-driven mode of education that now dominates K-12 education, to higher education.  Indeed, with their strong business backgrounds they want to exert their expertise by having universities offer a $10,000 Bachelor’s degree and decide which degrees are of most worth.   I […]

One Size Does Not Fit All

On August 4, 2011, Nikhil Goyal, a sophomore at Syosset High School in Long Island, New York wrote and asked me answer some interview questions for a book he was writing about “transforming our 19th Century industrial model of education into a 21st Century model grounded in creativity, imagination, and project-based learning. I had no […]

In Math and Science, Have American students Fallen Behind?

Is science and mathematics teaching inferior to science teaching in Singapore, South Korea, and Finland?  Have American students fallen behind in math and science? In the 2008 and 2012,  Science Debate asked presidential candidates (as well as congressional candidates) why have American students fallen behind in science and mathematics and what role should the federal government […]

In Math and Science, Have American students Fallen Behind?

Is science and mathematics teaching inferior to science teaching in Singapore, South Korea, and Finland?  Have American students fallen behind in math and science? In the 2008 and 2012,  Science Debate asked presidential candidates (as well as congressional candidates) why have American students fallen behind in science and mathematics and what role should the federal government […]

Georgia Educators’ Open Letter: Proposed Teacher Evaluation Invalid, Unreliable, & Detrimental to Student Learning

Starting this Fall, Georgia will carry out a teacher and leader assessment system that will use student progress on content tests and administrator evaluation based on a checklist of teacher classroom behaviors to evaluate teachers. A group of Georgia professors has prepared a letter sent to key politicians including the governor,  the GA state school […]

Georgia Educators' Open Letter: Proposed Teacher Evaluation Invalid, Unreliable, & Detrimental to Student Learning

Starting this Fall, Georgia will carry out a teacher and leader assessment system that will use student progress on content tests and administrator evaluation based on a checklist of teacher classroom behaviors to evaluate teachers. A group of Georgia professors has prepared a letter sent to key politicians including the governor,  the GA state school […]

3 Grassroots Education Organizations in Georgia

Educational reform desperately needs reform.  Reform in education today is in the hands of Federal programs including the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, and the Race to the Top Fund of 2009.  Although states can submit “flexibility requests” to receive waivers on some aspects of the NCLB, the reforms that have been affecting […]