The Social-Emotional Consequences of the Authoritarian Standards & High-Stakes Testing Sham

Note: This is the second in a series of articles on the consequences of the authoritarian standards & high-stakes testing sham. Anxious teachers, sobbing children was the title of an opinion article published in the Atlanta newspaper last Sunday.  The article, written by Stephanie Jones, professor of education at the University of Georgia, asks “What’s […]

The Social-Emotional Consequences of the Authoritarian Standards & High-Stakes Testing Sham

Note: This is the second in a series of articles on the consequences of the authoritarian standards & high-stakes testing sham. Anxious teachers, sobbing children was the title of an opinion article published in the Atlanta newspaper last Sunday.  The article, written by Stephanie Jones, professor of education at the University of Georgia, asks “What’s […]

Three Web 2.0 Science Projects for Your Science Courses

Web 2.0 refers to using the Web in a more interactive, and social way where students can create, share, publish and work together in collaborative groups.  Over the years, science teachers have created a variety of Web 2.0 projects for K-12 students. This post is to announce the availability of three Web 2.0 projects that […]

Ozone: An Inquiry into Air Quality

Atlanta leads the nation today in air quality—that is to say that it’s ozone forecast for today exceeds all other cities in the nation.  As shown in the AirNow map below, most of the Eastern part of the nation is in the moderate to USG ozone levels.  Moderate AQI (Air quality index) is 51 – 100. […]

Haiti Relief Effort: Global Resources & Agencies

The Haiti relief effort is in full operation, with the United Nations, individual relief organizations, the U.S. government including the U.S. military and eight additional departments and agencies within the government, and humanitarian aid, and resources from countries around the world.  The earthquake caused widespread damage, and ruined the infrastructure of the country.  The head […]

Haiti Relief Effort: Global Resources & Agencies

The Haiti relief effort is in full operation, with the United Nations, individual relief organizations, the U.S. government including the U.S. military and eight additional departments and agencies within the government, and humanitarian aid, and resources from countries around the world.  The earthquake caused widespread damage, and ruined the infrastructure of the country.  The head […]

Global Response to the Earthquake in Haiti

It has nearly been a week since the devastating 7.0 earthquake struck Port-Au-Prince, Haiti, and the surrounding cities and towns of this Caribbean country. The disaster is one of the worst in the Western Hemisphere, and our hearts go out to the suffering that is being experienced by so many people in this country. The […]

Impact and Cause of the Haiti Earthquake

The earthquake that occurred on January 12, 2010 near the city of Port-Au-Prince, Haiti has overwhelmed the country, and there is now an enormous relief effort underway in this Caribbean Country.  One of the most important things that we can do is to become involved in the welfare of the children and adults that have […]

Would it be shameful not to reform health care?

It would be shameful if we do nothing to fix the health care system in the USA, so says Dr. Joseph W. Stubbs who is president of the American College of Physicians and an internist in Albany.  You can read his editorial which was published in the Atlanta-Journal Constitution yesterday.  He argues from his position […]

Using Case Studies to Help Students Investigate Health Care Issues

There were two articles that I read today that contribute to how science teachers might use case studies (sometimes based on articles in the press or magazines, or actual cases written for students and teachers). The cases and/or artices could to create a context relevant to student dialogue, discussion & inquiry. The first article was […]

Health Care in the US: An S-T-S Issue for the Science Classroom?

Health care has emerged as one of the most contentious issues of the day in the USA. The contention is not new. This PBS time line covering the past 100 years identifies points of contention and progress in the government’s attempt to deal with health care on a national level. A more informative time line […]

Safer Schools in China

We know that the Sichuan province earthquake destroyed enormous numbers of schools, and that many children died as a result.  Andrew Revkin reported on his blog research being done by Santiago Pujol, an engineer at Purdue focusing on preventing just the kind of destruction that was done to schools in China.  Revkin has an illustration […]

Preparing for an Earthquake

What should our students and citizens know about earthquake preparedness? Certainly, the earthquake in China is prompting us to be able to answer these questions. I’ve only experienced three earthquakes, once many years ago in Columbus, Ohio, years later in San Francisco, and in the year 2000 in Seattle. The worst of these was in […]

Earthquake Building Codes for China’s Schools

A BBC article, China Anger over ‘shoddy schools,’ focused on the fact in some areas schools collapsed during the 7.9 Magnitude earthquake last week, while other buildings near the schools withstood the earthquake’s devastating energy. Beichuan Middle School, in the city of Mianyang, more than a 1000 students are missing. A day before the earthquake, […]

Earthquake Building Codes for China's Schools

A BBC article, China Anger over ‘shoddy schools,’ focused on the fact in some areas schools collapsed during the 7.9 Magnitude earthquake last week, while other buildings near the schools withstood the earthquake’s devastating energy. Beichuan Middle School, in the city of Mianyang, more than a 1000 students are missing. A day before the earthquake, […]

The Sichuan, China Earthquake

Yesterday, I wrote briefly about the 7.9 M earthquake that occurred in the mountainous area near the margin of the Sichuan Basin. Rescue workers are having a difficult time reaching villages in this remote and mountanous region. The google earth image below shows the difficulty faced by the rescue workers. Here the mountains average 2400 […]

Air Pollution: Monitoring the Air You Breathe

Do you think there is any harm in going for a brisk 3-mile run on a summer afternoon in the metro-Atlanta area? It’s not a good idea. The ozone level is highest in the late afternoon and early evening. Late afternoon readings of ozone are typically highest for the daily cycle of ozone levels. It’s […]

My First Colonoscopy

Dear Readers, Two days ago, I discussed two of my “first” experiences using the Internet. Well, today, want to talk about “my first colonoscopy”. For men and women, this is an important procedure that a healthcare provider uses to view the entire colon to see if there are any problems. Some months ago, I had […]

Fire in the pit

For the past 10 days I’ve been in Texas enjoying the outdoor world of farmland located half-way between Austin and Houston, near the town of Burton, Texas. It’s been a wonderful week of enjoying nature, and the world of antiquing. In the morning, fog rolls over the landscape giving us gorgeous scenes of the farmland […]

Air Pollution: Regional Influences & the Beijing Olympics

In the last post we discussed the relationship between Beijing’s air quality and the impact on athletes competing in the 2008 Summer Olympic Games. China is one of the leading contributors to greenhouse house gas emissions. It ranks number 2, right behind the U.S. According to some reports, China’s air and water ways are described […]

Air Pollution: Regional Influences & the Beijing Olympics

In the last post we discussed the relationship between Beijing’s air quality and the impact on athletes competing in the 2008 Summer Olympic Games. China is one of the leading contributors to greenhouse house gas emissions. It ranks number 2, right behind the U.S. According to some reports, China’s air and water ways are described […]

Project Beijing Air Quality

One of the issues of concern to many people is the impact of the air quality in Beijing on the athletes competing in outdoor activities, especially those involving 5K, 10K and all of the long distance running events, as well as many swimming events. Beijing’ air quality is could impact the health of the athletes, […]

California's Stem Cell Research Program—The Rest of the Story

In yesterday’s post I wrote that the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) announced the awarding of $45 million to medical researchers in many of California’s research centers, universities and institutes. However, the money for the grants was “borrowed money.” About $80 million in grants are expected to be announced next month. The CIRM was […]

California’s Stem Cell Research Program—The Rest of the Story

In yesterday’s post I wrote that the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) announced the awarding of $45 million to medical researchers in many of California’s research centers, universities and institutes. However, the money for the grants was “borrowed money.” About $80 million in grants are expected to be announced next month. The CIRM was […]

California Funds 72 Stem Cell Research Projects

In an earlier post I wrote about California being the action state in funding stem cell research. Today the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine awarded more than $45 million in research grants. Seventy-two grants totaling $45 million were given out to 20 academic institutions throughout the state. 231 applications were received. The grants ranged in […]

Allergies and Global Warming

In several of the past few posts, I’ve written about global warming by calling attention to recent publications by Elizabeth Kolbert and Al Gore. In there view, the evidence is all around us and we need to take notice of its effects: increased rainfall in some areas (the North Eastern part of the U.S.), widening […]

Allergies and Global Warming

In several of the past few posts, I’ve written about global warming by calling attention to recent publications by Elizabeth Kolbert and Al Gore. In there view, the evidence is all around us and we need to take notice of its effects: increased rainfall in some areas (the North Eastern part of the U.S.), widening […]