Archives for February 2010

From Earthquakes to Tsunami in Images

The 8.8 magnitude earthquake was the largest of many earthquakes that occur along the coast of Chile between the Nazca and South American tectonic plates.  As you can see on the map here, earthquakes regularly happen here, and around the rim of the Pacific (the Rim of Fire).  The 8.8 magnitude quake was a deep […]

Magnitude 8.8 Chile Earthquake

In the book The Art of Teaching Science, Chile is one the countries featured in an exploration of science education around the world.  The article was written by Claudia Rose, Director of the International Baccalaureate Program at the International School Nido de Aguilas in Santiago.  As of this writing, I was unable to access any […]

In a Liberal Democracy, Can Science Education Flourish With Common Standards?

Over the past two years, there has been a movement to develop a set of common standards in mathematics and reading, and the Carnegie Corporation announced that they would be collaborating with the National Research Council to develop a conceptual framework for a “new generation” of science standards.   Will these developments advance students understanding of […]

Science Teaching in Film and Video

Last week I received emails from colleagues that believe that film and video make a strong contribution to the public understanding of science.  The three emails reflect as many ways that film and video are used in science education. The first email was from Dr. Bill Hammack, the Engineerguy at the University of Illinois.  I […]

Adventures in Geology: Darwin & Fossils

Last year was the anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his book On the Origin of Species.  One of the activities I was involved in was work with a group of middle school students to explore some of the ideas shown in the Wordle that I […]

Adventures in Geology: Darwin & Fossils

Last year was the anniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, and the 150th anniversary of the publication of his book On the Origin of Species.  One of the activities I was involved in was work with a group of middle school students to explore some of the ideas shown in the Wordle that I […]

Engineering as a Way to Humanize Science Teaching

In earlier posts I have talked about the humanistic science paradigm of learning, and have indicated that this paradigm has the potential of increasing the interest that students have in science, as well as helping students comprehend and understand science.  In one post I made this point: What has emerged in science education is a […]

Global Weirding: Opportunity to Teach Climate Change

Thomas Friedman, writing in the New York Times entitled today’s post Global Weirding is Here.  Friedman prefers to use the term “global weirding” instead of global warming because the result of global warming is very “weird” weather.  He puts it this way: The weather gets weird. The hots are expected to get hotter, the wets […]

Science Teaching at Botby Högstadieskolas: An Experiment in Teaching Science as an Optional Course

Would it be viable to offer science as an optional subject? What would happen to enrollment in science if it were an optional course? Would students sign up for such a course? How could the course be structured to interest students in wanting to take the course? In this post, I am going to feature […]

Images from the Art of Science Teaching Weblog

The Art of Science Teaching Weblog is a place to discuss issues related to science teaching.  In today’s post, you will find a link to a Youtube movie comprised of many of the images and pictures that I’ve used in previous posts. I hope you enjoy the images, and the music.

Snow Day in the USA

According to one report, 49 of the 50 U.S. states reported snow on the ground today. Only Hawaii had no snow. Here in the Atlanta area, the massive storm that left Dallas under nearly a foot of snow (a record), the snow started falling around 1 P.M., and had been reduced to flurries by 8:00 […]

New Generation of Science Standards: Look to an Earlier Report

In the previous post I talked about the announcement from the National Research Council (NRC) that they will spearhead an effort to develop a new generation of science standards.  One of the major influences on the new effort by the NRC will be a report it published in 2006, entitled Taking Science to School: Learning and […]

New Generation of Science Standards: Part of the Common Standards Movement?

The National Research Council has received funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York to develop a framework for a new generation of science standards (K-12) based on the idea of disciplinary and cross-disciplinary core ideas. A committee of experts has already met (January 28-29) to begin the process of developing the conceptual framework. The […]

NASA's Role in Inspiring Teachers and Youth

NASA, created by Congress and President Eisenhower on October 1, 1958, has played an important role in the hearts and minds teachers and their students. Although originally created as a national defense strategy, NASA’s space exploration missions have effectively inspired generations of people, not only in the U.S., but around the world. I wanted to […]

NASA’s Role in Inspiring Teachers and Youth

NASA, created by Congress and President Eisenhower on October 1, 1958, has played an important role in the hearts and minds teachers and their students. Although originally created as a national defense strategy, NASA’s space exploration missions have effectively inspired generations of people, not only in the U.S., but around the world. I wanted to […]

Darwin Day: February 12

On Michael Barton’s blog, The Dispersal of Darwin, there is a post informing us of a movement by the American Humanist Association to get the President to officially name February 12 as Darwin Day.  You can link here to read about the International Darwin Day Foundation, and indeed you can sign a petition urging the […]