Archives for August 2009

Students Lag in Science So Says the National Center for Education Statistics

There was story on cnn.com today that caught my attention entitled U.S. students behind in math, science, analysis says.  The analysis was written by the National Center of Educational Statistics and was a summary analysis of several international assessments including the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), and the Program for International Student […]

Creation: A New Film About Charles Darwin

Earlier this week, I had a pingback  from Michael Barton’s very interesting website entitled The Dispersal of Darwin.  On his site I read about Michael’s recent trip to Cambridge, England, and on one of his posts from England he mentioned a new film that is coming out in September about Charles Darwin. The new film […]

Thinking Big: Stephen Hawking's Universe and Science Teaching

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post entitled Some Ways to Interest Students in Science, and one method I suggested was to help students “think big.”   Helping our students ask “big” questions, as Carl Sagan did, was the principle described here: Where did our universe come from?  How big is the Universe? and so […]

Thinking Big: Stephen Hawking’s Universe and Science Teaching

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post entitled Some Ways to Interest Students in Science, and one method I suggested was to help students “think big.”   Helping our students ask “big” questions, as Carl Sagan did, was the principle described here: Where did our universe come from?  How big is the Universe? and so […]

Bibliotheca Priestley

In the last two posts, I’ve explored several aspects of Steven Johnson’s book about Joseph Priestley: The Invention of Air: A Story of Science, Faith, Revolution, and The Birth of America.  In the spirit of the original Bibliotheca Alexandria, I identify here some of the key publications of Joseph Priestley, establishing here Bibliotheca Priestley. I […]

The Coffee House Syndrome: Humanizing the Classroom

No, this is not about Starbucks, Caribou, or McCafe coffee houses. But it is about coffee houses, and how coffee might have contributed to the field of science and science education, and indeed the Age of Enlightenment. In his book The Invention of Air, Steven Johnson introduces us to The London Coffee House, and a […]

The Invention of Air and Science Teaching

Several months ago I purchased Steven Johnson’s new book The Invention of Air: A Story of Science, Faith, Revolution, and the Birth of America.  I started reading it, but for some reason put it away, only to return to it this weekend.  I finished reading it this morning, and have been thinking about making a […]

Drain the Ocean: A Program Exploring Hidden Landscapes

I received an email note from Minjae Ormes, Digital PR + Film Consultant at National Geographic announcing Drain the Ocean, a TV program that explores the terrain and creatures beneath the ocean.  Using scientific research and CGI, NG “drains the ocean” to reveal a landscape largely unknown to us. The program airs Sunday, August 9 […]