Archives for November 2008

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Change of Pace

The theme that I’ve been writing about is change, alternative paradigms for learning, and how change needs to happen in our schools and schooling. There is a good chance that I won’t be making posts over the next few days as I’ll be traveling to Lincoln, England for a week. However, if I wanted to […]

Paradigm 2 Schools: Some Examples

Georgia Bracey, from Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, commented with an important question regarding the existence of schools that might be based on the humanistic paradigm (Paradigm 2) outlined in the previous post. There are many schools around the nation that embody a humanistic, student-centered character. I’ll talk here about a few of them. When I […]

Calling for a Change in Science Teaching is Not New, It's Bold

We are experiencing one of the most stressful economic downturns since the Great Depression.  To deal with this calamity the Federal Government has initiated a bailout of the banking system in hopes of staving off a collapse of the flow of money in our society.  We are also seeing rapid movement of the part of […]

Calling for a Change in Science Teaching is Not New, It’s Bold

We are experiencing one of the most stressful economic downturns since the Great Depression.  To deal with this calamity the Federal Government has initiated a bailout of the banking system in hopes of staving off a collapse of the flow of money in our society.  We are also seeing rapid movement of the part of […]

Paradigm Shift: Catching Up with Creative Teachers

I have been writing about change recently, and how change is needed in the science curriculum, and the pedagogy that we use to help students learn science.  Indeed, I’ve suggested we suspend high-risk testing until we can show that this type of assessment model tells us what students know, and how well teachers are teaching. […]

Why we need to re-think NCLB and support a Paradigm Shift

In a recent edweek.org newsletter there was a No Child Left Behind Alert that I found interesting, and provided the starting point for this post.  The forum discussion (a question is posed, and you can submit a response joining you to the discussion) for the day was:  What’s the most important thing President-to-be-Obama could do […]

A New Age for Science and Science Education?

In earlier posts on this Weblog, I introduced readers to ScienceDebate2008, a citizen effort to engage the US presidential candidates in a real debate on science, technology and society.  The debates never happened, but each candidate (science advisors, I suppose) answered the 14 questions that ScienceDebate2008 participants generated.  If you haven’t read the questions and […]

Freedom to Change & Transform the Practice of Science Teaching

Carl Rogers wrote a book many years ago entitled Freedom to Learn.  One of the most significant chapters in his book was “My way of facilitating a class.”  I read this chapter many times, and it had a profound influence on the way that I facilitated my classes at Georgia State University.  As a result […]

Freedom to Change & Transform the Practice of Science Teaching

Carl Rogers wrote a book many years ago entitled Freedom to Learn.  One of the most significant chapters in his book was “My way of facilitating a class.”  I read this chapter many times, and it had a profound influence on the way that I facilitated my classes at Georgia State University.  As a result […]

Transforming Science Teaching Practice: Personal Thoughts on Experimenting with and Changing Teaching Practice

In the 1970s and into the early 1980s, the major textbook that I used in graduate science education courses for teachers was Carl Rogers’ book, Freedom to Learn.  Rogers’ book provided the experiential and the theoretical background needed to help teachers transform their practice to incorporate humanistic principles.  The focus of these courses was to […]

Launched! Endeavor Blast Off!

I witnessed one Space Shuttle launch in 1982, and it was an unbelievable experience.  The sounds that you hear, and the vibrations you feel are amazing.  Here are a few pictures of the Endeavor launch, on November 14, 2008.                 After lift off roll procedures, followed by a […]

Set to Launch: Space Shuttle Endeavor—STS 126

STS 126, Space Shuttle Endeavor is set to launch tonight from Kennedy Space Center.  Seven astronauts will ride into space aboard the shuttle under a full moon. Here is a close up of Endeavor just prior to lift off!

Adventures in Geology–Is it pedagogy or petrology? Transforming Practice

In the last two posts, I’ve discussed the recent research that focuses on girls and science, and how teachers can make transformations in their practice to incorporate recent research.  Making a transformation in ones teaching is challenging and indeed a creative adventure. In the 1970s I was teaching an undergraduate geology course at Georgia State […]

Transforming Science Teaching Practice

In last post, which explored recent research on girls and science, I ended the entry with the notion that helping teachers transform their practice to incorporate new findings and theories about students, feminist perspectives and learning theory will determine the extent to which progress is made in furthering the participation of girls in science and […]

Girls and Science: Findings from Research

In a study published in the Journal of Research in Science Teaching (November, 2008), Brotman and Moore explore current research (in the past 12 years) in the field of gender and science education.  In their study, Girls and Science: A Review of Four Themes in the Science Education Literature, the authors created a landscape of […]

Union of Concerned Students

A bit of play on words, but today I received an email (which was sent to hundreds of people) from Kevin Knobloch, President of the Union of Concerned Scientists.  In the letter, Knobloch, who sees the election of Obama as a historical moment for the Union of Concerned Scientists, and its supporters, outlined key issues […]

A Watershed

Today, we achieved a Watershed in US history by electing Barack Obama as our next President. What else is there to say.  

How will science be affected by the Presidential election outcome?

I am writing this hours before we know the result of today’s election for President. Some thoughts about science and science education and how they might be affected by the election of John McCain or Barack Obama. Over the past several months ScienceDebate2008 has not only engaged John McCain and Barack Obama in responding to […]

Teaching Science Nonverbally: The Power of Visual Images and Sounds

I know that this topic seems a bit out of place, but I wanted to follow up comments made by David Calladine, one of the readers of this weblog.  David teaches science in the UK, and specializes in teaching environmental science.  One of his entries was in response to a post entitled Teaching About Global […]