Archives for October 2008

Toward a More Open Science Curriculum

There was a very interesting article in the New York Times entitled High Schools to Cultivate Interest.  The article focused in on a school district that is experimenting with “redefining traditional notions of a college-preparatory education and allowing students to pursue specialized interests that once were relegated to after-school clubs and weekend hobbies.”  As one […]

Human Side of Science: The ScienceDebate 2008 Conference

Last week, ScienceDebate 2008 held a conference at the University of Minnesota.  The conference was the result of a grass roots campaign hoping to engage Barack Obama and John McCain in a real debate on science and technology.  That conference never happened, although each candidate answered 14 questions posed by the ScienceDebate 2008 organizers.  ScienceDebate […]

Project-Based Science Instruction

The focus of the November issue of The Science Teacher is Project-Based Science (PBS), and it includes several articles written by science teachers and researchers.  In addition to articles on the theory underlying PBS, there are three articles that focus on specific classroom examples of projects: How Do Geckos Stick?; The Herpetology Project; and Investigating […]

Should Student (Science) Test Scores be used to evaluate teachers?

I ask this as a question, rather than making it a declarative statement.  But I was prompted to write about this topic based on a lead article in yesterday’s USA Today entitled Teachers take test scores to the bank as bonuses. The author described some examples of school districts offering bonuses to teachers if their students’ […]

A (Crude) Oil Lesson

Gas prices are down in the $2 range, and Thomas Friedman says that it leaves him with mixed feelings.  In his bi-weekly New York Times column today, he reminded us that when gas prices went beyond $4, Americans changed a lot—drove less, polluted less, exercised more, used more public transportation, and there was lots of […]

Science Curriculum—A Global Perspective

In this post I want to announce a new website entitled: Science Curriculum—A Global Perspective. In the last two posts I alluded to science teaching from a global perspective.  In the first of these two posts, entitled Infusing Global Thinking into science teaching, I discussed some examples of how educators have developed programs that infuse […]

Science Education Conference, Istanbul, Turkey, September, 2009

I received a note today from my colleague Fatih Tasar, Professor of Science Education at Gazi University, Ankara, Turkey that the European Science Education Research Association will hold its annual conference in Istanbul, Turkey, August 31 – September 4, 2009.  Proposal submissions should be made by January 16, 2009. The website for the conference is […]

Infusing Global ‘Thinking’ into Science Teaching

Some 15 years ago I met Boris Berenfeld, a scientist and researcher working at TERC (he is now a principal researcher at the Concord Consortium) on the Global Lab project, which was developed during the time I was working with colleagues in the US and Russia on the Global Thinking Project (GTP).   Berenfeld was a […]

Infusing Global 'Thinking' into Science Teaching

Some 15 years ago I met Boris Berenfeld, a scientist and researcher working at TERC (he is now a principal researcher at the Concord Consortium) on the Global Lab project, which was developed during the time I was working with colleagues in the US and Russia on the Global Thinking Project (GTP).   Berenfeld was a […]