Archives for November 2006

Global Thinking

In the last post I wrote about Citizen Diplomacy as enacted by hundreds of North American and Soviet psychologists and educators beginning in the 1980s at the height of the Cold War. One of the outcomes (there were many), was the co-creation of the Global Thinking Project (originally called the Soviet-American Global Thinking Project). The […]

Citizen Diplomacy

I received an email from Anya Kucharev, Project Director, INTERNEWS INTERACT, Citizen Diplomacy Archive Project. She explained that she was Director of the Citizen Archive Project at Stanford University. She was contacting citizens that were involved in citizen diplomacy projects. The term citizen diplomacy was coined to describe the activities of hundreds of American and […]

If It Isn't Working, Fix It!: The Case of Science in Urban Schools

Another article in the New York Times by Ellen V. Futter, “Failing Science” pointed to the utter disastrous situation of science teaching in America’s urban school districts. (You may not be able to “read” this article unless you have an account with the NYTimes). The Futter article is a response to the announced results of […]

If It Isn’t Working, Fix It!: The Case of Science in Urban Schools

Another article in the New York Times by Ellen V. Futter, “Failing Science” pointed to the utter disastrous situation of science teaching in America’s urban school districts. (You may not be able to “read” this article unless you have an account with the NYTimes). The Futter article is a response to the announced results of […]

Science Literacy in Atlanta: Time for Action

This is a follow-up of a post I made a few days ago. Letter to the Editor: Maureen Downey recently quoted Atlanta Superintendent Beverly Hall, who said “There is no way for students to do well on NAEP science if they are not reading and doing math. ” (Editorial, Nov. 20, 2006) I believe Dr. […]

Happy Thanksgiving!!

I wish the readers of this blog a Happy Thanksgiving, and hope that you have a wonderful day. Jack Hassard

Atlanta Schools Should Be Emphasizing Science

Yesterday I raised the question whether literacy in reading and math was necessary to teach and learn science. I was prompted by the statement made recently by the Atlanta Public School District’s superintendent that she was not concerned that science scores were low when the district needed to emphasize literacy, not science. And of course […]

Reading and Math Needed Before Science Can Be Learned?

The Science Report for the Trial Urban District Assessment recently became available by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Ten large urban U.S. school districts volunteered to participate in science testing, grades 4 and 8 in 2005, and the results of the test administration were just made available. Most editorial pages of newspapers in […]

Election Results: Good News for the Environment?

There has been some discussion that the November election results might be good for a green environment. How so? For one thing, each committee chair will now be a Democrat, and for those who believe that one of the roles of government is to enact legislation to support a greener U.S., and global environment, this […]

Monitoring Beijing's Air: Citizen Scientists in China

I want to continue my discussion of the environment in this post. I read with interest another editorial by the New York Times writer Thomas Friedman entitled The Green Leap Forward which again focused the pollution of China’s environment. He started his article with a little story about a friend of his to does his […]

Monitoring Beijing’s Air: Citizen Scientists in China

I want to continue my discussion of the environment in this post. I read with interest another editorial by the New York Times writer Thomas Friedman entitled The Green Leap Forward which again focused the pollution of China’s environment. He started his article with a little story about a friend of his to does his […]

State of Denial: Getting Real About the Environment

State of denial seems to be a way of describing the view that many people have about the effects of human growth and activity on the environment. Three different sources of information are worth considering here: an article by Thomas Friedman, comments by Kofi Annan, and a new book by E. O. Wilson. Firstly, I […]

Beyond The Basics: Solutions for Science Teaching

In the last post I noted that there is a tendency to fall back and retreat when students’ test scores are not up to par according to state, national or international trends. Indeed, over the past 20 years, US students have not compared very well to counterparts in other countries. When this happens, there appears […]

Back to Basics: A False Solution to Mathematics and Science Test Scores

There was an article today in the New York Times entitled As Math Scores Lag, a New Push for the Basics. The article is about “rethinking” the teaching of mathematics, which has been prompted by students’, lagging test scores on international tests. The blame is put squarely on the “new math” which some label as […]

Innovation in Education: Time for Change

Ok, now that there is going to be a political change in Washington, and in many state governments as well, will this be reflected in needed changes in education, especially in science, mathematics and technology education? There is an enormous need at the Federal level that supports educational innovation, and that this philosophy be reflected […]

The Race to the Moon: von Braun and Korolyov

In the last two posts I have discussed the space exploration and rocket development contributions of Wernher von Braun for the Americans and Sergey Pavlovich Korolyov for the Soviets. Each man is considered the person who led these respective countries into space. Sending humans to the moon and returning them safely, and indeed exploring beyond […]

Wernher von Braun and the American Rocket Program

In the previous post I focused on Sergey Pavlovich Korolyov, the Chief Designer and brilliant engineer of the Soviet rocket program. In this post I want to talk about Wernher von Braun and his contribution to the American rocket and space program. My thinking is influenced by Cadbury’s book, SpaceRace, as well as my own […]

Sergey Pavlovich Korolyov—Russian Rocket Scientist

Sergey Pavlovich Korolyov, featured in D. Cadbury’s new book, SpaceRace, was the man unknown to the west who built the rockets that put the first satellite into orbit, the first man in orbit about the earth, as well as several rockets to the moon. Who was Sergey Pavlovich Korolyov? Why was he unknown to the […]

God and Science, Part II

In July I wrote a post entitled God and Science which was prompted by Francis Collins book, The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence of Belief. Collins, a Christian, outlines how a scientist-believer can integrate science and faith. Now Time Magazine has interviewed Dr. Collins and Richard Dawkins. Collins is Director of the National […]

Hubble Repair Mission

NASA adminstrators announced two days ago that they will design and carry out a daring mission in 2008 to repair and upgrade the Hubble Telescope which was launched 16 years ago. Two shuttles will be readied for the mission, one to be used if a rescue mission is needed. The repair will involve very sophisticated […]