Archives for October 2006

Russian Space Web

In the process of reading SpaceRace, and searching the web for further resources and information, I came across Anatoly Zak’s incredible website, Russian Space Web. According to Zak’s site, “The mission of this site is to preserve and popularize the history of space exploration and to promote the cooperation in space.” And Anatoly Zak does […]

The Race for Space: Launching a Satellite for the International Geophysical Year (1957)

The race for space for a long time was a dream of von Braun’s rocket scientists, and Sergei Korolev (Russian: Серге́й Па́влович Королёв) in Russia, but any of their hopes were dashed by the political forces, and the general feeling that building rockets for space exploration was a fantasy, and probably couldn’t be done. However, […]

The Race for Space–The American-Soviet Battle for Space

I am reading an exciting book entitled SpaceRace by D. Cadbury, Harper Collins, 2006. If you are interested in the space program, enjoy historical suspense, then this is a book for you. The book weaves the story of the German rocket scientist Wernher von Braun and the Soviet rocket expert Sergei Korolev. The story begins […]

Evolution Enters The November Ballot Box

Evolution is an election issue in Ohio this year. Ninety percent of the science faculty at Case Western Reserve signed a letter endorsing the candidacy of Tom Sawyer for Ohio School Board. Sawyer is running against the incumbent Dr. D. Owens Fink, a professor of Marketing at the University of Akron. Fink supports I.D. and […]

The Shenandoah Valley

Drove today from Marietta to Dublin (VA) on our way to Lynchburg, about 400 miles. Most of the drive was in the gorgeous Shenadnoah Valley. I’ve written before about the Shenandoah Valley in an earlier post in a discussion of plate tectonics, and other matters geology. Interstate 81 runs the length of the Valley, and […]

Rest and Sleep for NASA: Participate in the Bed Rest Study

I read an interesting article in the New York Times online today entitled NASA Seeks Volunteers to Spend 3 Weeks in Bed (It’s Tougher Than You Think). Apparently, according one of the NASA scientists (Dr. Liz Warren)working on the project, its been difficult to find volunteers. The article intriqued me, so I went to NASA’s […]

Katrina Re-Visited

Last Fall, I wrote a Katrina online activity entitled, Hurricane Katrina: A Citizen Resource. This citizen resource is designed to help us understand the magnitude of this natural disaster, and to point us toward ways to reduce the destruction and loss of life caused by natural disasters. Nearly 3,000 visitors have made use of the […]

How Are Quakes Related?

I came across an interesting article No, One Quake Did Not Lead to Another, in New York Times Online. The article pointed out that following Hawaii’s 6.7 quake on October 15, two other big quakes occurred, a 6.8 near Papua New Guinea, and a 6.4 off the coast of Peru. People wondered, Are these quakes […]

The Hawaii Quake, or Is It Quakes?

In the wake of the mid-October Hawaii quake, scientists are not sure whether the >6 aftershock was an aftershock, or an independent earthquake. The first quake, which was measured at 6.7 on the Richter scale occurred at 7:07 A.M. at a depth of 24 miles; the second quake was measured at 6.0 on the Richter […]

Earthquakes in Hawaii—Unusual or Part of Hawaii's Geology?

The other day I heard a CNN news-reader, during the time when readers don’t read, but speak for themselves, say right after a story of the October 15th big Hawaii earthquake: “My, what a strange place for an earthquake to take place!” So much for earth science education! Actually we know that the Hawaiian Islands […]

Earthquakes in Hawaii—Unusual or Part of Hawaii’s Geology?

The other day I heard a CNN news-reader, during the time when readers don’t read, but speak for themselves, say right after a story of the October 15th big Hawaii earthquake: “My, what a strange place for an earthquake to take place!” So much for earth science education! Actually we know that the Hawaiian Islands […]

Is the North Korean Nuclear Bomb Test a Science Education Issue?

The short answer is yes. Here’s a longer answer. In 1986, Richard Rhodes published the Pulitzer Prize book, The Making of the Atomic Bomb giving us a sweeping account of the making of the first atomic bomb, including who and how they did it. Image: The Making of the Atomic Bomb by Richard Rhodes The […]

A New Look for The Art of Teaching Science

I’ve changed the Word Press Theme for my site, and I hope you like the new look. It’s called Neptune, and reflects the content of the site more closely in that we talk about science and science education. The theme is cleaner than the previous theme that I used, and I hope will be easier […]

Science In Whose Service?

The U.S. government is using scientific atmospheric tests to determine whether or not North Korea exploded an underground nuclear device. Air samples taken by the Pentagon have been analyzed, however, with contradictory results. One test showed that there were radioactive atoms in the air samples; another did not. Japan and China tested the air near […]

2006 Nobel Prize in Physics: The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE)

John C. Mather of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, and George F. Smoot of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory received the 2006 Nobel Prize in physics. They will split the $1.3 million prize. They headed a team of scientists and engineers who developed the COBE satellite which was launched in 1989. It measured the temperature and […]

The Nobel Prizes

The first of five Nobel Prizes was awarded today in Sweden to two American scientists “for their discovery of RNA interference – gene silencing by double-stranded RNA.” The recipient were Andrew Z. Fire (Stanford), and Craig C. Mello (University of Massachusetts. More prizes will be anounced this week: Physics, October 3, Chemistry, October 4, Economics, […]